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2018 MLB Draft Profile – Stony Brook

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RHP Aaron Pinto is every pitcher I’ve pushed on this site the past few seasons. Or maybe that’s just what it feels like sometimes. That pitcher would be an undersized righthander who doesn’t walk anybody, strikes out a batter an inning like it’s nothing, and gets by (or, more accurately, more than gets by) with superior fastball command and well-timed offspeed stuff (an impressive low-80s slider in this case). For what it’s worth, most of these style of pitchers aren’t ones to wow on the radar gun. Pinto brings a little extra juice with a fastball up to 94 MPH (87-92 mostly). On top of that, all Pinto has done since day one — well, day one of his sophomore year technically since his first ten-ish innings as a freshman need not be spoken of — at Stony Brook is get results. He’s good. Use a pick on him late, get him in a pro bullpen, and let him do his thing. Maybe it all catches up to him in AA or maybe he keeps getting strikeouts, limiting free passes, and one day reaches the big leagues. All for the cost of a late-round pick, too. Not for nothing, but the word I jotted down in my notes for Pinto was “awesome.” That one was just for you, Neil. Be cool for once, man. You’re smart – we get it. Let people enjoy things. Damn.

RHP Bret Clarke is a decent prospect who has gotten decent results with decent stuff (88-93 FB, above-average SL). Decent here is meant in the best way possible as the athletic, deceptive Clarke truly is a draft-worthy talent. Nothing necessarily jumps off the page about him, but there’s value in across the board decency. Sidearming LHP Teddy Rodliff is a fun college arm who comes up a little short in stuff to make it in pro ball. In one of those things that is almost certainly only neat to me, here are Rodliff’s BB/9 rates over the years: 3.96, 0.69, 6.33, and 6.59 (and counting). What in the world got into Rodliff in 2016? RHP Greg Marino is a little more conventionally interesting as a redshirt-sophomore with a pro build (6-6, 200) and better peripherals than results. He’s one to watch going forward.

It’s tough to find a sure bet to be drafted out of Stony Brook’s collection of 2018 draft-eligible hitters. My vote for most likely/deserving to be selected is 2B/SS Bobby Honeyman, a versatile defender who makes loads of quality contact at the plate. I like him a lot as is, but can also admit that the thought of him converting to catcher in the pros, as some have deemed possible, is pretty damn appealing as well. Honeyman may not have the pop necessary to make it in pro ball, but I’d be willing to spare a late-round pick or undrafted free agent contract to find out for sure.

1B/3B Andruw Gazzola has hit a lot over the years, so maybe he gets a shot. There’s some positional versatility working him there as a potential four-corners defender. OF Dylan Resk showed a ton of power last year, but hasn’t been able to match his sophomore season stats in his chance at collegiate draft eligibility. Maybe next year. OF/1B Brandon Alamo could also be a senior-sign to watch in 2019. Led by 3B/SS Nick Grande, OF Chris Hamilton, and 2B/OF Michael Wilson, next year’s class of non-senior hitters at Stony Brook has a good shot at making a little bit more draft noise than the present one.

SR RHP Aaron Pinto (2018)
rSO RHP Greg Marino (2018)
JR RHP Bret Clarke (2018)
SR LHP Teddy Rodliff (2018)
SR LHP Kevin Kernan (2018)
JR RHP Michael Russell (2018)
JR RHP Kyle Stinson (2018)
rSO RHP Aaron Glickstein (2018)
SR RHP Nick Montefusco (2018)
SR LHP/OF Cole Creighton (2018)
SR 1B/3B Andruw Gazzola (2018)
SR 2B/SS Bobby Honeyman (2018)
JR OF Dylan Resk (2018)
JR 2B Brandon Janofsky (2018)
JR C Sean Buckhout (2018)
JR OF/1B Brandon Alamo (2018)
JR OF Cristian Montes (2018)
SO RHP Brian Herrmann (2019)
SO RHP Sam Turcotte (2019)
SO 2B/OF Michael Wilson (2019)
SO OF Chris Hamilton (2019)
SO 3B/SS Nick Grande (2019)
FR C John Tuccillo (2020)

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