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2015 MLB Draft – Top 100 D1 College Catching Prospects

Title explains what we’re doing here. Other college prospects and high school guys will get their moment soon enough. I cut the list off at 100, but added in some bonus prospects (in order despite being unnumbered) at the end. First base will be up later in the day.

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1. Fresno State JR C Taylor Ward (2015): plus to plus-plus arm strength; good athlete; average at best speed; average at best power upside; good defensive tools, but needs reps; arm alone is special enough to carry him up ladder professionally; 6-2, 190 pounds

2013: .195/.306/.336 – 16 BB/26 K – 2/4 SB – 113 AB
2014: .320/.395/.438 – 28 BB/29 K – 3/6 SB – 219 AB
2015: .304/.413/.486 – 35 BB/34 K – 7/7 SB – 214 AB

2. Illinois JR C Jason Goldstein (2015): really good defender; strong arm; good approach; quick bat; exceptionally smart catcher, calls own pitches like a veteran; maybe not the best bat, best glove, or best athlete of the class, but the overall package is big league caliber; FAVORITE; 6-0, 200 pounds

2013: .210/.266/.252 – 9 BB/21 K – 3/3 SB – 143 AB
2014: .316/.370/.435 – 16 BB/17 K – 2/3 SB – 193 AB
2015: .303/.384/.511 – 21 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 188 AB

3. Washington JR C Austin Rei (2015): plus all-around defender; outstanding reputation as a pitch framer; above-average to plus arm; above-average raw power; 5-11, 180 pounds

2013: .240/.356/.260 – 5 BB/11 K – 0/0 SB – 50 AB
2014: .314/.408/.451 – 21 BB/36 K – 1/1 SB – 153 AB
2015: .330/.445/.681 – 12 BB/28 K – 0/0 SB – 91 AB

4. Dallas Baptist rJR C/OF Daniel Salters (2015): plus to plus-plus arm; average to plus raw power, wide range of opinions on his pop but I lean to the plus side; good approach; good athlete; quick bat; above-average glove; decent speed; very divisive prospect that some think of as a fringy corner outfield prospect and others (like me) buy into as a potential first-division starting catcher if it all works; FAVORITE; 6-3, 225 pounds

2014: .251/.398/.454 – 45 BB/29 K – 3/4 SB – 227 AB
2015: .265/.377/.410 – 30 BB/41 K – 4/5 SB – 200 AB

5. Illinois State rJR C/3B Paul DeJong (2015): can also play 2B; average arm; smart hitter; above-average raw power; has made great strides defensively in short order; FAVORITE; 6-1, 200 pounds

2014: .349/.430/.596 – 22 BB/39 K – 2/5 SB – 218 AB
2015: .333/.427/.605 – 28 BB/50 K – 2/3 SB – 210 AB

6. Penn SR C Austin Bossart (2015): strong defender; good arm; physically strong; based on scouting heat, would be surprised if the Orioles don’t consider selecting him higher than many project; 6-2, 210 pounds

2012: .261/.313/.306 – 10 BB/13 K – 6/8 SB – 134 AB
2013: .257/.301/.431 – 4 BB/24 K – 9/10 SB – 144 AB
2014: .297/.397/.430 – 12 BB/29 K – 1/2 SB – 158 AB
2015: .358/.420/.540 – 13 BB/18 K – 6/9 SB – 137 AB

7. USC SR C Garrett Stubbs (2015): really good athlete; versatile defender; good behind plate; average speed; average or better arm; may or may not profile as regular catcher (I think he could), but added value as super-sub makes him intriguing fit for creative team; 5-10, 175 pounds

2012: .205/.299/.244 – 15 BB/17 K – 2/4 SB – 127 AB
2013: .265/.380/.316 – 22 BB/14 K – 2/5 SB – 136 AB
2014: .287/.382/.310 – 16 BB/22 K – 6/11 SB – 171 AB
2015: .330/.421/.415 – 25 BB/27 K – 19/26 SB – 212 AB

8. Houston JR C Ian Rice (2015): great approach; above-average to plus raw power; solid defender, but still learning on job; very impressed at his improvements behind the plate; average arm; bat hasn’t played quite as expected, but approach remains consistent and think he’ll make a quality pro; FAVORITE; 6-0, 190 pounds

2014*: .331/.500/.647 – 44 BB/23 K – 5/6 SB – 139 AB
2015: .258/.431/.371 – 43 BB/32 K – 1/2 SB – 151 AB

9. Stony Brook SR C/SS Cole Peragine (2015): good defensive tools as middle infielder, hands and feet play really well behind plate; strong enough arm, though more good than great; intriguing pop, hasn’t shown up in games quite yet; above-average speed when instincts considered, average raw foot speed; love his approach at the plate; can’t help but fall for a converted shortstop who took to catching as well as he has; FAVORITE; 5-11, 180 pounds

2012: .276/.362/.379 – 21 BB/21 K – 8/10 SB – 214 AB
2013: .264/.352/.323 – 23 BB/21 K – 6/9 SB – 201 AB
2014: .287/.396/.378 – 31 BB/14 K – 13/15 SB – 188 AB
2015: .296/.443/.366 – 47 BB/19 K – 3/4 SB – 186 AB

10. Arizona State JR C RJ Ybarra (2015): plus arm strength; above-average to plus power; slow; good approach; raw defensively; 6-0, 230 pounds

2013: .304/.361/.491 – 5 BB/27 K – 0/0 SB – 112 AB
2014: .273/.342/.394 – 19 BB/45 K – 1/1 SB – 198 AB
2015: .284/.383/.493 – 23 BB/30 K – 1/3 SB – 134 AB

11. Maryland JR C Kevin Martir (2015): above-average raw power; above-average arm; steady glove after lots of work; very well-coached; 5-11, 215 pounds

2014: .269/.359/.386 – 14 BB/28 K – 3/4 SB – 171 AB
2015: .330/.428/.495 – 28 BB/29 K – 3/7 SB – 218 AB

12. Miami SR C Garrett Kennedy (2015): good approach; sneaky pop; average arm; steady glove; 6-1, 200 pounds

2013: .290/.430/.395 – 29 BB/23 K – 0/2 SB – 124 AB
2014: .231/.336/.308 – 15 BB/23 K – 1/1 SB – 117 AB
2015: .347/.448/.518 – 29 BB/24 K – 1/1 SB – 193 AB

13. North Carolina JR C Korey Dunbar (2015): average power; steady glove, tools for more; good approach; plus arm; comfortable with scouting spotlight; 6-0, 215 pounds

2013: .159/.302/.205 – 7 BB/14 K – 1/1 SB – 44 AB
2014: .238/.333/.326 – 24 BB/50 K – 4/6 SB – 181 AB
2015: .288/.362/.484 – 21 BB/46 K – 0/1 SB – 184 AB

14. LSU SR C Kade Scivicque (2015): average or better arm; good defender; leadership abilities evident; 5-11, 220 pounds

2014: .304/.377/.467 – 13 BB/19 K – 0/0 SB – 184 AB
2015: .353/.393/.517 – 12 BB/20 K – 0/0 SB – 201 AB

15. Wagner SR C Nick Dini (2015): has also played 2B and 3B; experienced catching high velocity arms; will be a steal if given a chance; could be Austin Barnes 2.0; FAVORITE; 5-9, 180 pounds

2012: .278/.338/.384 – 16 BB/29 K – 6/7 SB – 198 AB
2013: .316/.369/.460 – 12 BB/15 K – 13/13 SB – 215 AB
2015: .392/.489/.625 – 30 BB/7 K – 14/15 SB – 176 AB

16. Bowling Green rSO C Trey Keegan (2015): quick bat; good athlete; above-average arm; 5-11, 190 pounds

2014: .233/.333/.315 – 10 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 73 AB
2015: .295/.405/.453 – 29 BB/16 K – 8/11 SB – 190 AB

17. Arizona SR C Riley Moore (2015): power upside; above-average arm; good defensive tools, but still a work in progress; great athlete; very quick behind plate; could be better pro than college player; 6-3, 190 pounds

2012: .265/.360/.338 – 34 BB/50 K – 2/5 SB – 219 AB
2013: .244/.394/.343 – 35 BB/26 K – 3/3 SB – 172 AB
2014: .247/.339/.318 – 14 BB/34 K – 1/1 SB – 154 AB
2015: .306/.397/.426 – 32 BB/36 K – 2/3 SB – 209 AB

18. Rice SR C John Clay Reeves (2015): mature defender; accurate arm, average at best arm strength; strong hit tool; even more power upside than he’s shown; has called own games; Arkansas transfer; 6-0, 190 pounds

2014: .317/.360/.439 – 17 BB/32 K – 1/2 SB – 221 AB
2015: .324/.424/.484 – 24 BB/29 K – 3/3 SB – 188 AB

19. UAB rJR C Esteban Tresgallo (2015): good glove; smart; Miami transfer; 6-1, 210 pounds

2012: .243/.335/.379 – 20 BB/46 K – 3/4 SB – 140 AB
2015: .292/.404/.571 – 26 BB/37 K – 8/8 SB – 161 AB

20. Southeastern Louisiana JR C Jameson Fisher (2015): strong hit tool; average or better power; below-average speed; raw defender; labrum surgery caused him to miss 2015 season; no idea about his recovery or signability, but still talented enough to consider using an early pick on to find out; 6-2, 200 pounds

2013: .279/.372/.384 – 21 BB/23 K – 8/16 SB – 219 AB
2014: .389/.481/.469 – 30 BB/29 K – 9/17 SB – 239 AB

21. Morehead State rSR C/OF Chris Robinson (2015): good athlete; plus speed; interesting defensive tools; 5-10

2014: .332/.417/.407 – 26 BB/20 K – 8/10 SB – 226 AB
2015: .402/.472/.654 – 29 BB/31 K – 10/12 SB – 246 AB

22. Wisconsin-Milwaukee JR C Mitch Ghelfi (2015): power upside; great athlete; above-average to plus arm; defense needs work; raw tools stack up with almost any college catching peer; 5-11, 190 pounds

2013: .315/.374/.466 – 14 BB/21 K – 6/9 SB – 146 AB
2014: .267/.352/.342 – 20 BB/31 K – 7/9 SB – 161 AB
2015: .356/.463/.514 – 27 BB/31 K – 4/8 SB – 177 AB

23. Coastal Carolina JR C Casey Schroeder (2015): interesting hit tool; defense needs work, but tools are there; good athlete; above-average arm; big power upside; strong; good approach; average speed; Kentucky transfer; 6-0, 190 pounds

2015: .230/.370/.500 – 33 BB/41 K – 2/3 SB – 174 AB

24. Stetson JR C/1B Pat Mazeika (2015): strong hit tool; above-average raw power; good approach; average at best glove, improving somewhat; wish the glove was a surer bet, but the bat could play elsewhere if need be; 6-3, 220 pounds

2013: .410/.512/.528 – 32 BB/19 K – 1/1 SB – 212 AB
2014: .354/.479/.471 – 34 BB/18 K – 1/1 SB – 206 AB
2015: .307/.439/.485 – 33 BB/16 K – 1/1 SB – 202 AB

25. Belmont SR C/3B Matt Beaty (2015): flat-out hitter; 6-0, 210 pounds

2012: .261/.335/.449 – 25 BB/24 K – 7/10 SB – 234 AB
2013: .291/.402/.449 – 26 BB/19 K – 2/2 SB – 158 AB
2014: .352/.478/.536 – 28 BB/14 K – 4/4 SB – 125 AB
2015: .382/.469/.668 – 32 BB/17 K – 12/14 SB – 238 AB

26. LSU JR C Chris Chinea (2015): good defender; good athlete; plus raw power; have heard from some who think he’s best catcher on LSU roster; 6-0, 210 pounds (2013: .277/.373/.362 – 7 BB/3 K – 0/0 SB – 47 AB) (2014: .250/.310/.395 – 7 BB/4 K – 0/0 SB – 76 AB) (2015: .369/.403/.590 – 12 BB/31 K – 1/2 SB – 222 AB)

27. Georgetown JR C Nick Collins (2015): intriguing bat; average power; quick bat; raw defender, has some trouble actually catching the ball right now; reminded me of Cameron Rupp, but with rougher hands behind plate; 6-2, 220 pounds (2013: .322/.372/.429 – 12 BB/19 K – 0/1 SB – 177 AB) (2014: .351/.418/.426 – 18 BB/27 K – 2/4 SB – 188 AB) (2015: .370/.435/.540 – 22 BB/21 K – 6/7 SB – 211 AB)

28. William & Mary JR C/1B Charley Gould (2015): has consistently produced at the plate; 6-2, 210 pounds (2014: .333/.406/.567 – 16 BB/32 K – 0/0 SB – 150 AB) (2015: .388/.473/.706 – 24 BB/28 K – 0/1 SB – 170 AB)

29. Georgia JR C Zack Bowers (2015): plus arm strength; plus raw power; defense needs work; 6-1, 200 pounds (2013: .240/.286/.462 – 6 BB/36 K – 0/0 SB – 104 AB) (2014: .189/.299/.302 – 18 BB/43 K – 2/2 SB – 159 AB) (2015: .252/.421/.503 – 37 BB/55 K – 2/3 SB – 155 AB)

30. East Carolina JR C/1B Luke Lowery (2015): above-average to plus raw power, others have it plus-plus and maybe the raw is there, but hit tool keeps it from playing to full potential in game; plus bat speed; average speed, moves well for big man; all-or-nothing approach stems from timing issues; defense needs work; some think he could handle corner OF; “Schwarber level glove” behind plate; want to like him more than I do; 6-2, 240 pounds (2013: .304/.347/.489 – 6 BB/31 K – 1/2 SB – 92 AB) (2014: .287/.321/.400 – 6 BB/47 K – 3/8 SB – 160 AB) (2015: .313/.411/.561 – 25 BB/55 K – 7/9 SB – 198 AB)

31. Oregon SR C/1B Shaun Chase (2015): plus-plus raw power; strong arm; questionable glove, but playable; one of the draft’s most intriguing underachievers who could surprise in pro ball; 6-0, 215 pounds (2013: .230/.313/.368 – 10 BB/39 K – 0/1 SB – 87 AB) (2014: .283/.352/.634 – 15 BB/49 K – 1/2 SB – 145 AB) (2015: .191/.333/.391 – 20 BB/47 K – 0/0 SB – 115 AB)

32. Harvard SR C/3B Ethan Ferreira (2015): smart; interesting bat; 6-0, 200 pounds (2012: .231/.293/.297 – 8 BB/28 K – 3/6 SB – 91 AB) (2013: .224/.384/.276 – 15 BB/13 K – 0/1 SB – 58 AB) (2014: .238/.308/.300 – 9 BB/24 K – 0/0 SB – 130 AB) (2015: .361/.425/.594 – 18 BB/22 K – 4/6 SB – 155 AB)

33. Old Dominion C/JR 3B PJ Higgins (2015): gap power; strong arm; could also play 2B or OF; 5-11, 185 pounds (2013: .336/.380/.434 – 6 BB/16 K – 1/3 SB – 113 AB) (2014: .308/.361/.368 – 22 BB/22 K – 7/9 SB – 250 AB) (2015: .335/.402/.452 – 25 BB/16 K – 3/5 SB – 239 AB)

34. South Florida JR C/3B Levi Borders (2015): average or better raw power; good glove; average arm; approach holds him back; 6-3, 185 pounds (2013: .232/.301/.312 – 10 BB/41 K – 1/3 SB – 138 AB) (2014: .243/.341/.317 – 17 BB/41 K – 1/1 SB – 189 AB) (2015: .295/.381/.498 – 17 BB/63 K – 4/4 SB – 217 AB)

35. Illinois-Chicago SR C/OF Tyler Detmer (2015): relatively new to position; good arm; good approach; power upside; 6-0, 180 pounds (2013: .285/.364/.375 – 20 BB/36 K – 3/8 SB – 200 AB) (2014: .330/.436/.470 – 28 BB/25 K – 2/2 SB – 185 AB) (2015: .351/.452/.534 – 25 BB/34 K – 1/2 SB – 208 AB)

36. UC Davis JR C Cameron Olson (2015): plus raw power; plus arm; defense improving; hasn’t gotten reps, but upside is there; 6-1, 220 pounds (2013: .286/.365/.381 – 5 BB/24 K – 0/0 SB – 84 AB) (2015: .208/.323/.453 – 6 BB/18 K – 1/1 SB – 53 AB)

37. Connecticut JR C Max McDowell (2015): good athlete; good speed; good defender; power upside; has the well-rounded skill set of a steady backup catcher; 6-2, 210 pounds (2013: .275/.379/.357 – 19 BB/23 K – 6/8 SB – 171 AB) (2014: .275/.376/.352 – 22 BB/18 K – 3/7 SB – 182 AB) (2015: .286/.392/.418 – 24 BB/27 K – 2/5 SB – 213 AB)

38. Oklahoma JR C/RHP Anthony Hermelyn (2015): average or better hit tool; good approach; good glove; 92-94 FB; has also played 1B and 3B; 6-1, 210 pounds (2013: .275/.356/.309 – 23 BB/29 K – 2/3 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .289/.339/.360 – 15 BB/29 K – 1/2 SB – 211 AB) (2015: .321/.360/.453 – 15 BB/21 K – 3/5 SB – 243 AB)

39. Cal Poly JR C Brian Mundell (2015): good frame; nice swing; quick bat; 6-3, 225 pounds (2013: .270/.349/.480 – 22 BB/44 K – 2/3 SB – 204 AB) (2014: .279/.374/.409 – 39 BB/47 K – 1/1 SB – 215 AB) (2015: .282/.377/.447 – 26 BB/27 K – 0/2 SB – 170 AB)

40. Georgia State JR C Joey Roach (2015): good glove; 5-11, 200 pounds (2013: .287/.366/.487 – 12 BB/20 K – 2/4 SB – 115 AB) (2014: .301/.379/.432 – 13 BB/27 K – 1/1 SB – 146 AB) (2015: .302/.381/.473 – 20 BB/25 K – 1/1 SB – 205 AB)

41. Georgia Southern SR C Chase Griffin (2015): big raw power; can also play 1B or OF; strong; impressive bat speed; rough behind plate, but has gotten better over years; strong arm; anticipated breakout has yet to come; 6-0, 200 pounds (2012: .310/.395/.523 – 22 BB/48 K – 2/2 SB – 197 AB) (2013: .264/.339/.360 – 27 BB/47 K – 0/0 SB – 239 AB) (2014: .258/.336/.369 – 22 BB/42 K – 2/3 SB – 217 AB) (2015: .265/.304/.404 – 13 BB/56 K – 2/2 SB – 223 AB)

42. Stetson SR C/OF Garrett Russini (2015): strong arm; power upside; steady glove; good approach; good athlete; 6-0, 200 pounds (2013: .271/.348/.350 – 25 BB/45 K – 0/0 SB – 203 AB) (2014: .297/.365/.482 – 21 BB/30 K – 3/3 SB – 222 AB) (2015: .272/.358/.401 – 24 BB/43 K – 0/0 SB – 202 AB)

43. Winthrop JR C Roger Gonzales (2015): plus defender; Miami transfer; 5-9, 190 pounds (2015: .335/.409/.425 – 21 BB/28 K – 1/1 SB – 167 AB)

44. UCLA JR C Darrell Miller (2015): strong arm; raw defender; 6-2, 220 pounds (2015: .254/.321/.353 – 14 BB/22 K – 0/0 SB – 173 AB)

45. Stanford JR C Austin Barr (2015): raw defensively; plus arm; power upside; good athlete; quick bat; 6-2, 215 pounds (2014: .146/.205/.268 – 2 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 41 AB) (2015: .241/.356/.348 – 18 BB/30 K – 0/0 SB – 112 AB)

46. San Diego SR C Jesse Jenner (2015): average or better power; strong arm; good athlete; slow; 6-0, 200 pounds (2014: .348/.371/.447 – 9 BB/15 K – 4/6 SB – 161 AB) (2015: .314/.407/.415 – 14 BB/17 K – 3/6 SB – 159 AB)

47. California JR C/3B Mitchell Kranson (2015): has experience calling own games; area guys rave about him; 5-8, 200 pounds (2013: .288/.333/.365 – 7 BB/13 K – 1/1 SB – 104 AB) (2014: .231/.283/.317 – 7 BB/13 K – 0/1 SB – 104 AB) (2015: .252/.285/.422 – 4 BB/10 K – 0/0 SB – 147 AB)

48. Xavier JR C Dan Rizzie (2015): quick bat; plus defender; 6-2, 180 pounds (2014: .307/.395/.459 – 28 BB/37 K – 9/12 SB – 218 AB) (2015: .275/.373/.275 – 6 BB/10 K – 2/2 SB – 51 AB)

49. Seattle SR C Brian Olson (2015): good defender; power upside; 6-0, 190 pounds (2012: .289/.393/.382 – 23 BB/16 K – 1/3 SB – 152 AB) (2013: .273/.374/.304 – 26 BB/41 K – 1/2 SB – 194 AB) (2014: .320/.393/.458 – 22 BB/26 K – 2/2 SB – 203 AB) (2015: .267/.382/.388 – 38 BB/35 K – 2/6 SB – 206 AB)

50. Maine JR C Kevin Stypulkowski (2015): accurate arm; steady glove; Florida transfer; 6-2, 220 pounds (2013: .184/.262/.211 – 2 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 38 AB) (2015: .254/.324/.377 – 15 BB/15 K – 2/4 SB – 130 AB)

51. Nebraska SR C Tanner Lubach (2015): average or better (underrated) hit tool; some power upside; good approach; improving behind plate, has gone from not so good to pretty impressive; very smart defender; 6-0, 190 pounds (2013: .252/.322/.337 – 15 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 163 AB) (2014: .282/.337/.423 – 13 BB/27 K – 1/1 SB – 149 AB) (2015: .312/.375/.441 – 14 BB/29 K – 2/3 SB – 186 AB)

52. North Florida JR C Keith Skinner (2015): power upside; good approach; 6-1, 210 pounds (2015: .325/.395/.429 – 19 BB/19 K – 0/1 SB – 154 AB)

53. Fordham JR C Charles Galiano (2015): good defender; good approach; good athlete; above-average arm; 6-0, 200 pounds (2013: .253/.363/.348 – 11 BB/38 K – 3/3 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .280/.348/.418 – 11 BB/38 K – 0/2 SB – 182 AB) (2015: .301/.370/.474 – 12 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 196 AB)

54. Southern Mississippi SR C Austin Roussel (2015): 6-0, 210 pounds (2014: .213/.348/.329 – 32 BB/18 K – 3/3 SB – 164 AB) (2015: .278/.418/.435 – 26 BB/8 K – 1/2 SB – 115 AB)

55. UNLV SR C/OF Erik VanMeetren (2015): 6-4, 210 pounds (2012: .264/.359/.391 – 10 BB/19 K – 1/1 SB – 87 AB) (2013: .273/.361/.326 – 25 BB/36 K – 4/7 SB – 187 AB) (2014: .291/.391/.394 – 29 BB/44 K – 7/9 SB – 213 AB) (2015: .301/.447/.475 – 38 BB/36 K – 4/9 SB – 183 AB)

56. Georgetown SR C AC Carter (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2014: .245/.366/.322 – 22 BB/20 K – 0/0 SB – 143 AB) (2015: .316/.410/.468 – 23 BB/23 K – 0/1 SB – 190 AB)

57. Middle Tennessee State SR C/RHP Michael Adkins (2015): plus defender; plus arm; power upside; 88-92 FB; 6-1, 200 pounds (2013: .225/.292/.324 – 15 BB/42 K – 0/0 SB – 182 AB) (2014: .282/.358/.352 – 18 BB/29 K – 1/2 SB – 142 AB) (2015: .245/.307/.328 – 15 BB/44 K – 1/1 SB – 192 AB)

58. Tennessee JR C David Houser (2015): plus defender; strong arm; 6-2, 220 pounds (2013: .183/.271/.217 – 11 BB/38 K – 0/2 SB – 115 AB) (2014: .229/.279/.266 – 6 BB/44 K – 1/1 SB – 109 AB) (2015: .277/.375/.313 – 11 BB/20 K – 0/0 SB – 83 AB)

59. Duke rSR C Mike Rosenfeld (2015): elite defensive upside; 5-10, 185 pounds (2012: .329/.403/.476 – 16 BB/48 K – 170 AB – 7/8 SB) (2013: .377/.451/.525 – 8 BB/9 K – 2/3 SB – 61 AB) (2014: .268/.396/.335 – 32 BB/42 K – 7 – 11/SB – 194 AB) (2015: .278/.411/.377 – 32 BB/32 K – 10/11 SB – 162 AB)

60. Florida State SR C Daniel De La Calle (2015): plus defender; plus arm; way too much swing and miss; 6-3, 220 pounds (2014: .224/.315/.241 – 17 BB/37 K – 1/1 SB – 174 AB) (2015: .261/.303/.457 – 10 BB/57 K – 2/3 SB – 184 AB)

61. Texas A&M SR C Mitchell Nau (2015): solid power; steady defender, I like him behind plate more than others; good footwork; quick release; good approach; decent runner; 5-10, 200 pounds (2012: .200/.261/.233 – 6 BB/12 K – 0/1 SB – 60 AB) (2013: .226/.287/.323 – 8 BB/13 K – 0/0 SB – 124 AB) (2014: .274/.319/.345 – 3 BB/10 K – 1/1 SB – 84 AB) (2015: .376/.470/.510 – 28 BB/28 K – 1/2 SB – 194 AB)

62. Indiana SR C/OF Brian Hartong (2015): good athlete; strong; good defender; 6-5, 215 pounds (2014: .313/.345/.450 – 6 BB/12 K – 7/8 SB – 160 AB) (2015: .300/.361/.382 – 14 BB/24 K – 0/1 SB – 220 AB)

63. Rice JR C Hunter Kopycinski (2015): plus arm; good athlete; 5-11, 180 pounds (2013: .300/.341/.425 – 3 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 40 AB) (2014: .262/.340/.262 – 5 BB/6 K – 0/0 SB – 42 AB) (2015: .312/.364/.348 – 9 BB/11 K – 0/1 SB – 138 AB)

64. Northwestern State SR C CJ Webster (2015): good defender; strong arm; leader behind dish; Fullerton transfer; 6-2, 200 pounds (2014: .255/.335/.319 – 13 BB/26 K – 0/1 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .271/.359/.392 – 22 BB/31 K – 0/1 SB – 199 AB)

65. Northwestern State JR C/OF Cort Brinson (2015): power upside; good athlete; 6-0, 205 pounds (2014: .294/.409/.418 – 16 BB/18 K – 5/6 SB – 170 AB) (2015: .350/.407/.518 – 12 BB/35 K – 3/4 SB – 220 AB)

66. Southern Illinois Edwardsville SR C Parker Guinn (2015): 5-10, 180 pounds (2015: .269/.367/.552 – 17 BB/21 K – 1/3 SB – 145 AB)

67. VMI rSR C Matt Winn (2015): strong glove; 6-0, 220 pounds (2013: .320/.439/.438 – 19 BB/37 K – 0/0 SB – 153 AB) (2014: .204/.389/.276 – 16 BB/27 K – 1/1 SB – 152 AB) (2015: .304/.391/.586 – 28 BB/49 K – 0/1 SB – 191 AB)

68. Western Carolina JR C Danny Bermudez (2015): good glove; 5-11, 215 pounds (2014: .305/.443/.381 – 16 BB/28 K – 3/5 SB – 105 AB) (2015: .324/.422/.527 – 19 BB/48 K – 3/3 SB – 182 AB)

69. San Diego State rJR C/OF Seby Zavala (2015): 6-0, 180 pounds (2012: .276/.372/.366 – 19 BB/30 K – 4/5 SB – 123 AB) (2014: .297/.387/.397 – 28 BB/44 K – 2/6 SB – 232 AB) (2015: .283/.396/.539 – 29 BB/48 K – 4/6 SB – 219 AB)

70. Oklahoma JR C Chris Shaw (2015): power upside; much improved defender; second best Chris Shaw in class; FAVORITE; 6-1, 200 pounds (2013*: .372/.479/.715 – 22 BB/40 K – 4/6 SB – 172 AB) (2014*: .384/.471/.707 – 27 BB/35 K – 0/0 SB – 198 AB) (2015: .247/.316/.406 – 7 BB/36 K – 1/2 SB – 170 AB)

71. Michigan rSR C Kendall Patrick (2015): 6-2, 220 pounds (2015: .242/.399/.439 – 22 BB/34 K – 0/0 SB – 132 AB)

72. Oklahoma State SR C Bryan Case (2015): strong arm; 6-3, 200 pounds (2014: .262/.398/.488 – 12 BB/22 K – 2/4 SB – 84 AB) (2015: .241/.328/.429 – 14 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 112 AB)

73. Oklahoma State SR C/OF Gage Green (2015): good speed; solid athlete; 5-10, 195 pounds (2012: .220/.343/.322 – 9 BB/11 K – 5/5 SB – 59 AB) (2013: .298./408/.416 – 23 BB/39 K – 13/17 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .310/.392/.423 – 20 BB/44 K – 20/22 SB – 239 AB) (2015: .284/.398/.408 – 26 BB/43 K – 18/21 SB – 211 AB)

74. Mississippi SR C Austin Knight (2015): power upside; strong defensive tools; 5-11, 200 pounds (2012: .267/.371/.267 – 4 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 30 AB) (2013: .167/.192/.208 – 1 BB/9 K – 0/0 SB – 24 AB) (2014: .303/.324/.303 – 1 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 33 AB) (2015: .268/.354/.362 – 14 BB/28 K – 0/1 SB – 138 AB)

75. Virginia JR C/RHP Robbie Coman (2015): good glove; 6-1, 200 pounds (2014: .283/.377/.368 – 13 BB/9 K – 106 AB) (2015: .309/.366/.364 – 13 BB/15 K – 2/6 SB – 165 AB)

76. Michigan SR C/OF Kevin White (2015): average power; strong arm; 6-0, 215 pounds (2012: .248/.328/.349 – 13 BB/45 K – 2/5 SB – 109 AB) (2013: .290/.348/.426 – 15 BB/40 K – 9/10 SB – 162 AB) (2014: .253/.293/.373 – 5 BB/26 K – 4/5 SB – 75 AB) (2015: .274/.432/.396 – 27 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 106 AB)

77. Central Michigan SR C Tyler Huntey (2015): great athlete; 6-3, 210 pounds (2014: .329/.393/.460 – 15 BB/34 K – 13/15 SB – 237 AB) (2015: .266/.365/.356 – 27 BB/44 K – 4/5 SB – 222 AB)

78. Texas-San Antonio SR C John Bormann (2015): steady glove; above-average arm; 6-0, 200 pounds (2014: .288/.341/.404 – 10 BB/28 K – 4/8 SB – 208 AB) (2015: .273/.384/.398 – 22 BB/28 K – 4/4 SB – 216 AB)

79. Southeast Missouri State JR C/1B Garrett Gandolfo (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2015: .303/.427/.528 – 40 BB/41 K – 1/2 SB – 178 AB)

80. William & Mary JR C Ryan Hissey (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2015: .290/.400/.525 – 23 BB/36 K – 1/2 SB – 162 AB)

81. Belmont SR C/1B Alec Diamond (2015): 5-10, 175 pounds (2013: .357/.444/.390 – 25 BB/15 K – 5/9 SB – 154 AB) (2014: .293/.375/.351 – 23 BB/17 K – 4/6 SB – 188 AB) (2015: .323/.427/.358 – 35 BB/8 K – 7/10 SB – 226 AB)

82. Houston Baptist SR C Samm Wiggins (2015): 5-8, 175 pounds (2014: .273/.392/.335 – 26 BB/22 K – 3/3 SB – 161 AB) (2015: .328/.419/.497 – 26 BB/30 K – 0/4 SB – 195 AB)

83. St. John’s rJR C Tyler Sanchez (2015): good glove; 6-3, 220 pounds (2014: .246/.350/.336 – 14 BB/24 K – 0/0 SB – 134 AB) (2015: .231/.336/.405 – 14 BB/22 K – 1/1 SB – 121 AB)

84. UC Irvine rSR C Jerry McClanahan (2015): good glove; 6-2, 200 pounds (2012: .265/.407/.378 – 20 BB/12 K – 0/2 SB – 98 AB) (2013: .252/.427/.311 – 27 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 135 AB) (2014: .304/.377/.343 – 29 BB/33 K – 3/5 SB – 207 AB) (2015: .276/.434/.354 – 44 BB/30 K – 1/3 SB – 181 AB)

85. Eastern Michigan rSO C/OF Michael Mioduszewski (2015): strong; great athlete; 6-4, 240 pounds (2014: .248/.329/.348 – 13 BB/32 K – 5/6 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .259/.315/.330 – 12 BB/53 K – 4/7 SB – 197 AB)

86. Alabama SO C Will Haynie (2015): plus raw power; plus arm; good defender; old Ben Davis comp; clearly not ready for the pro game, but raw power is no joke; 6-5, 230 pounds (2014: .177/.231/.274 – 7 BB/51 K – 0/0 SB – 113 AB) (2015: .195/.299/.391 – 21 BB/80 K – 1/2 SB – 169 AB)

87. Butler SR C/1B Ryan Wojciechowski (2015): power upside; 6-0, 210 pounds (2015: .316/.403/.497 – 27 BB/38 K – 2/3 SB – 187 AB)

88. Southeastern Louisiana SR C Sam Roberson (2015): out in 2015; 5-11, 190 pounds (2013: .209/.283/.264 – 20 BB/30 K – 7/11 SB – 201 AB) (2014: .296/.380/.423 – 20 BB/28 K – 8/11 SB – 189 AB)

89. Central Michigan SR C/1B Tommy Monnot (2015): strong arm; good defensive tools; 6-3, 210 pounds (2012: .324/.390/.437 – 6 BB/13 K – 0/0 SB – 71 AB) (2013: .219/.286/.290 – 10 BB/29 K – 1/1 SB – 169 AB) (2014: .186/.250/.291 – 6 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 86 AB) (2015: .244/.328/.452 – 11 BB/24 K – 2/2 SB – 168 AB)

90. Bucknell JR C Jon Mayer (2015): strong arm; raw defender; 6-2, 210 pounds (2013: .231/.286/.282 – 1 BB/12 K – 1/1 SB – 39 AB) (2014: .246/.340/.381 – 11 BB/30 K – 0/0 SB – 118 AB) (2015: .276/.382/.379 – 17 BB/19 K – 0/1 SB – 145 AB)

91. Western Illinois SR C JJ Reimer (2015): good glove; 5-11, 200 pounds (2014: .319/.374/.429 – 7 BB/17 K – 3/4 SB – 91 AB) (2015: .286/.402/.387 – 22 BB/22 K – 8/9 SB – 168 AB)

92. Louisiana SR C/3B Evan Powell (2015): good defender; LSU transfer; 5-10, 205 pounds (2014: .250/.370/.517 – 9 BB/17 K – 2/2 SB – 60 AB) (2015: .232/.333/.377 – 17 BB/26 K – 8/13 SB – 138 AB)

93. Nevada SR C Jordan Devencenzi (2015): good glove; good arm; 6-0, 210 pounds (2014: .265/.326/.311 – 5 BB/13 K – 1/4 SB – 196 AB) (2015: .294/.359/.382 – 9 BB/14 K – 3/9 SB – 170 AB)

94. Louisiana-Monroe JR C Dalton Todd (2015): really smart catcher; 5-11, 175 pounds (2013: .150/.227/.250 – 7 BB/29 K – 1/1 SB – 80 AB) (2014: .170/.302/.226 – 6 BB/14 K – 1/2 SB – 53 AB) (2015: .262/.402/.330 – 23 BB/27 K – 1/2 SB – 103 AB)

95. High Point SR C Josh Spano (2015): great arm; steady glove; power upside; 6-2, 215 pounds (2013: .311/.367/.387 – 19 BB/34 K – 1/1 SB – 225 AB) (2014: .279/.335/.365 – 17 BB/31 K – 0/0 SB – 208 AB) (2015: .288/.336/.418 – 9 BB/22 K – 2/4 SB – 208 AB)

96. Southeastern Louisiana JR C Chris Eades (2015): strong arm; power upside; 6-3, 240 pounds (2015: .262/.383/.384 – 21 BB/54 K – 1/1 SB – 164 AB)

97. Florida International JR C Zack Soria (2015): good glove; 5-10, 200 pounds (2015: .293/.370/.337 – 19 BB/31 K – 4/5 SB – 205 AB)

98. Central Connecticut State JR C Connor Fitzsimmons (2015): plus arm; good athlete; above-average glove; 5-9, 180 pounds (2013: .226/.293/.250 – 5 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 84 AB) (2014: .230/.314/.291 – 8 BB/33 K – 2/2 SB – 148 AB) (2015: .263/.356/.321 – 14 BB/37 K – 0/1 SB – 137 AB)

99. Louisiana JR C Nick Thurman (2015): good defender; 6-2, 210 pounds (2013: .294/.339/.373 – 2 BB/15 K – 1/2 SB – 51 AB) (2014: .222/.364/.315 – 5 BB/22 K – 0/0 SB – 54 AB) (2015: .272/.346/.359 – 24 BB/52 K – 4/4 SB – 206 AB)

100. Nicholls State SR C Christian Correa (2015): good glove; 5-10, 200 pounds (2015: .261/.354/.345 – 12 BB/22 K – 1/3 SB – 142 AB)

*****

Cal State Fullerton JR C AJ Kennedy (2015): plus defender; plus pitch-framer; strong arm; bag is a major question; 6-0, 190 pounds (2014: .178/.268/.205 – 9 BB/15 K – 1/1 SB – 73 AB) (2015: .171/.263/.217 – 17 BB/42 K – 0/2 SB – 152 AB)

Mississippi State SR C Cody Walker (2015): good defensive tools; strong arm; quick transfer; catches ball well; bat lags behind; 5-10, 200 pounds (2014: .222/.382/.296 – 6 BB/6 K – 0/0 SB – 27 AB) (2015: .259/.375/.481 – 4 BB/5 K – 0/0 SB – 27 AB)

UC Riverside JR C Matthew Ellis (2015): plus arm; good glove; 6-1, 170 pounds (2014: .249/.335/.272 – 22 BB/31 K – 2/4 SB – 169 AB) (2015: .207/.246/.259 – 4 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 116 AB)

Albany SR C Craig Lepre (2015): really good glove; 6-2, 200 pounds (2014: .273/.341/.338 – 10 BB/17 K – 0/0 SB – 154 AB) (2015: .214/.318/.286 – 15 BB/13 K – 0/2 SB – 126 AB)

Texas A&M JR C Michael Barash (2015): steady glove; average or better arm; LSU transfer; 6-1, 200 pounds (2015: .239/.322/.284 – 14 BB/19 K – 1/3 SB – 134 AB)

Mount St. Mary’s SR C Andrew Clow (2015): 5-10, 185 pounds (2014: .369/.415/.468 – 12 BB/17 K – 5/7 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .346/.394/.497 – 10 BB/16 K – 3/4 SB – 159 AB)

Towson rSO C Chris Henze (2015): 6-3, 215 pounds (2015: .331/.419/.503 – 22 BB/37 K – 3/5 SB – 151 AB)

UNC Wilmington rSO C Gavin Stupienski (2015): 6-2, 220 pounds (2014: .257/.364/.343 – 7 BB/10 K – 0/0 SB – 35 AB) (2015: .341/.410/.517 – 20 BB/29 K – 2/2 SB – 176 AB)

Alabama State rSO C Chris Biocic (2015): 6-3, 200 pounds (2015: .357/.428/.485 – 17 BB/27 K – 12/15 SB – 171 AB)

Texas-San Antonio JR C/OF Kevin Markham (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2015: .311/.393/.505 – 26 BB/44 K – 8/11 SB – 222 AB)

Butler JR C Chris Marras (2015): 5-11, 200 pounds (2015: .304/.404/.467 – 21 BB/22 K – 3/3 SB – 135 AB)

Oral Roberts rSR C/1B Audie Afenir (2015): 6-2, 220 pounds (2015: .347/.424/.472 – 29 BB/44 K – 0/0 SB – 216 AB)

South Dakota State SR C Reid Clary (2015): 6-4, 200 pounds (2014: .256/.353/.316 – 17 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 117 AB) (2015: .293/.398/.448 – 27 BB/28 K – 6/8 SB – 174 AB)

North Dakota State JR C/OF Taylor Sanders (2015): 5-9, 190 pounds (2015: .344/.414/.432 – 12 BB/12 K – 1/1 SB – 125 AB)

Fairleigh Dickinson rJR C Patrick McClure (2015): 6-0, 210 pounds (2014: .271/.335/.336 – 10 BB/22 K – 0/0 SB – 140 AB) (2015: .276/.405/.418 – 21 BB/18 K – 0/0 SB – 134 AB)

Army JR C Ben Smith (2015): 5-10, 180 pounds (2015: .310/.404/.439 – 17 BB/21 K – 1/4 SB – 155 AB)

Valparaiso JR C/OF Daniel Delaney (2015): 5-11, 200 pounds (2015: .325/.400/.439 – 27 BB/30 K – 2/3 SB – 212 AB)

Central Florida SR C Jordan Savinon (2015): 6-3, 215 pounds (2015: .299/.387/.470 – 17 BB/34 K – 0/0 SB – 134 AB)

UC Davis SR C Izaak Silva (2015): 5-10, 185 pounds (2015: .320/.392/.456 – 24 BB/38 K – 6/9 SB – 206 AB)

Northwestern rSR C Scott Heelan (2015): Virginia Tech transfer; 5-10, 180 pounds (2014: .317/.393/.413 – 17 BB/16 K – 1/3 SB – 189 AB) (2015: .332/.386/.428 – 17 BB/11 K – 1/1 SB – 208 AB)

Iowa JR C Daniel Aaron Moriel (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2015: .281/.455/.404 – 14 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 57 AB)

Siena JR C Dave Hoffmann (2015): 6-0, 175 pounds (2014: .255/.341/.340 – 18 BB/26 K – 0/0 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .242/.387/.409 – 27 BB/32 K – 0/0 SB – 132 AB)

Texas State JR C/1B Tanner Hill (2015): 6-1, 250 pounds (2014: .220/.302/.353 – 14 BB/29 K – 0/0 SB – 150 AB) (2015: .319/.379/.511 – 16 BB/35 K – 2/4 SB – 188 AB)

Saint Louis JR C Jake Henson (2015): 6-0, 215 pounds (2013: .297/.387/.453 – 9 BB/9 K – 0/0 SB – 64 AB) (2014: .244/.313/.344 – 14 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 131 AB) (2015: .327/.366/.531 – 11 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 211 AB)

High Point SR C/1B Spencer Angelis (2015): 6-2, 200 pounds (2013: .314/.388/.415 – 22 BB/27 K – 0/0 SB – 188 AB) (2014: .390/.477/.512 – 27 BB/16 K – 0/4 SB – 213 AB) (2015: .333/.439/.471 – 29 BB/37 K – 3/5 SB – 174 AB)

Columbia JR C Logan Boyher (2015): 5-10, 200 pounds (2013: .273/.293/.382 – 1 BB/9 K – 0/1 SB – 55 AB) (2014: .253/.306/.303 – 2 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 99 AB) (2015: .303/.422/.449 – 17 BB/23 K – 2/2 SB – 89 AB)

Liberty SR C Becker Sankey (2015): 6-0, 215 pounds (2014: .221/.335/.322 – 12 BB/32 K – 0/0 SB – 149 AB) (2015: .267/.379/.503 – 29 BB/58 K – 1/3 SB – 195 AB)

New Mexico State JR C Brent Hermanussen (2015): 6-3, 215 pounds (2015: .291/.366/.480 – 14 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 127 AB)

Presbyterian SR C Cam McRae (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2014: .267/.324/.403 – 10 BB/23 K – 4/8 SB – 191 AB) (2015: .364/.407/.525 – 11 BB/39 K – 7/10 SB – 217 AB)

Utah JR C AJ Young (2015): 6-3, 220 pounds (2013: .211/.328/.321 – 16 BB/38 K – 0/0 SB – 109 AB) (2014: .203/.372/.216 – 16 BB/29 K – 0/0 SB – 74 AB) (2015: .297/.407/.446 – 27 BB/49 K – 3/6 SB – 175 AB)

Xavier SR C/1B Derek Hasenbeck (2015): 6-2, 210 pounds (2012: .253/.351/.343 – 29 BB/32 K – 1/5 SB – 198 AB) (2013: .261/.390/.400 – 31 BB/29 K – 0/0 SB – 180 AB) (2014: .309/.387/.428 – 30 BB/33 K – 0/2 SB – 236 AB) (2015: .282/.343/.426 – 16 BB/30 K – 1/1 SB – 188 AB)

Bradley SR C Drew Carlile (2015): 6-3, 230 pounds (2015: .283/.320/.478 – 7 BB/19 K – 3/4 SB – 138 AB)

New Jersey Tech JR C Stephan Halibej (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2013: .281/.366/.399 – 14 BB/32 K – 2/2 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .268/.315/.366 – 5 BB/11 K – 0/0 SB – 82 AB) (2015: .301/.368/.416 – 17 BB/25 K – 0/1 SB – 173 AB)

Texas Southern rJR C Javier Valdez (2015): 5-8, 160 pounds (2015: .298/.384/.405 – 19 BB/13 K – 2/3 SB – 131 AB)

Kennesaw State JR C Brennan Morgan (2015): 6-4, 225 pounds (2014: .281/.357/.386 – 20 BB/34 K – 2/3 SB – 210 AB) (2015: .276/.383/.400 – 29 BB/31 K – 5/6 SB – 185 AB)

Saint Louis SR C/OF Colton Frabasilio (2015): 6-3, 210 pounds (2014: .253/.353/.296 – 20 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 162 AB) (2015: .313/.381/.460 – 19 BB/28 K – 1/2 SB – 211 AB)

Fairfield SR C Sebastian Salvo (2015): 6-2, 235 pounds (2014: .354/.426/.505 – 11 BB/14 K – 0/1 SB – 99 AB) (2015: .283/.367/.428 – 20 BB/37 K – 2/3 SB – 173 AB)

Kansas State JR C Tyler Moore (2015): 5-11, 190 pounds (2015: .302/.371/.465 – 15 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 172 AB)

North Florida SR C James Abbatinozzi (2015): 6-1, 220 pounds (2014: .314/.402/.353 – 13 BB/20 K – 3/3 SB – 102 AB) (2015: .315/.425/.391 – 17 BB/14 K – 2/3 SB – 92 AB)

Prairie View A&M SR C Grant Dougherty (2015): 6-1, 190 pounds (2014: .258/.350/.368 – 18 BB/27 K – 6/6 SB – 155 AB) (2015: .321/.468/.404 – 38 BB/38 K – 23/30 SB – 156 AB)

Incarnate Word SR C Colton Besett (2015): 6-0, 185 pounds (2015: .256/.369/.444 – 17 BB/32 K – 1/2 SB – 117 AB)

Ohio rJR C Cody Gaertner (2015): 5-10, 175 pounds (2012: .338/.369/.411 – 6 BB/12 K – 4/7 SB – 151 AB) (2013: .256/.325/.341 – 16 BB/21 K – 5/11 SB – 176 AB) (2015: .295/.363/.411 – 18 BB/27 K – 2/4 SB – 224 AB)

Old Dominion SR C Mike Perez (2015): 5-11, 210 pounds (2013: .275/.353/.470 – 16 BB/30 K – 1/2 SB – 149 AB) (2014: .244/.321/.382 – 15 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 123 AB) (2015: .276/.365/.412 – 15 BB/36 K – 1/1 SB – 170 AB)

Southeast Missouri State JR C Scott Mitchell (2015): 5-10, 160 pounds (2014: .291/.402/.333 – 25 BB/24 K – 3/4 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .316/.399/.395 – 20 BB/19 K – 0/0 SB – 152 AB)

Ohio State SR C Aaron Gretz (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2012: .253/.384/.286 – 19 BB/18 K – 1/2 SB – 91 AB) (2013: .259/.361/.304 – 25 BB/25 K – 0/1 SB – 158 AB) (2014: .284/.381/.367 – 17 BB/11 K – 1/1 SB – 109 AB) (2015: .279/.370/.367 – 23 BB/21 K – 0/0 SB – 147 AB)

Radford rSR C Josh Reavis (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2014: .264/.382/.360 – 27 BB/32 K – 11/13 SB – 178 AB) (2015: .291/.413/.398 – 30 BB/42 K – 10/12 SB – 196 AB)

NC State JR C Chance Shepard (2015): 6-1, 230 pounds (2014: .234/.379/.394 – 22 BB/34 K – 1/3 SB – 94 AB) (2015: .200/.347/.425 – 19 BB/32 K – 1/1 SB – 80 AB)

The Citadel JR C Stephen Windham (2015): 6-0, 190 pounds (2015: .305/.398/.416 – 28 BB/44 K – 0/2 SB – 190 AB)

Quinnipiac JR C/1B Lou Iannotti (2015): 6-3, 170 pounds (2015: .284/.353/.376 – 18 BB/23 K – 10/11 SB – 197 AB)

North Dakota State rSO C JT Core (2015): 6-2, 210 pounds (2015: .299/.409/.381 – 17 BB/16 K – 1/1 SB – 97 AB)

Charleston Southern SR C Andrew Widell (2015): 5-10, 190 pounds (2014: .303/.405/.360 – 30 BB/25 K – 0/3 SB – 175 AB) (2015: .269/.370/.366 – 27 BB/33 K – 6/7 SB – 189 AB)

Northern Kentucky JR C Logan Spurlin (2015): 6-4, 220 pounds (2014: .350/.416/.503 – 17 BB/39 K – 0/0 SB – 183 AB) (2015: .218/.351/.324 – 19 BB/31 K – 0/0 SB – 142 AB)

Travis Maezes, Max Schrock, and Ian Rice

It would take exceptionally disappointing seasons for any of Ian Happ, Dansby Swanson, and Alex Bregman to slip past this year’s draft’s first twenty-six picks and into the compensatory round. DJ Stewart’s margin for error isn’t as great, but it would still be a surprise to me to see him fall past the thirty-sixth and final pick of the draft’s first day. Beyond those four names, all bets are off. More bluntly, the fifth spot on this particular ranking of college bats is where things get weird.

Weird doesn’t have to be bad, so I have no problem being the high man on Michigan JR 3B Travis Maezes for now. His hit tool is legit, his power should play average or better, and he has the athleticism, arm strength, and instincts to be a really strong third baseman in the pros. Real life work commitments and frustration at the death of College Splits put me way behind on writing about last year’s draft. If I had written all that I wanted to, I assure you that many glowing pieces on Cal State Fullerton 3B Matt Chapman would have been written. I absolutely loved Chapman as a draft prospect and think he’ll be an above-average pro player for a long time. I don’t bring him up just to relive the past, of course; from a skills standpoint, Maezes reminds me a lot of Chapman. I swear that’s a comparison that I came by honestly through watching them both, hearing from smarter people than myself, and reading whatever has been written about them from the comfort of my couch. Then I looked at the numbers (top Maezes, bottom Chapman) and…

.307/.403/.444 with 54 BB/64 K in 530 PA
.295/.391/.443 with 73 BB/84 K in 702 PA

…whoa. That’s pretty good. Another player comparison that I’ve heard for Maezes that takes me back to my earliest days as a baseball fan is former Phillies 3B Dave Hollins, he of the 162 game average of .260/.358/.420 with 18 HR, 27 2B, 76 BB, and 113 K*.

South Carolina JR 2B Max Schrock could be added to the mix above and not be out of place in the least. His career line to date isn’t too far off from Chapman especially at .281/.381/.422 with 58 BB/45 K in 446 PA. A friend in the game recently compared him to another former Fullerton star, Tim Wallach. I’m not sure I see that since the body types, handedness, and home run power all seem off to me, but it’s something to think about. I’ve run into similar issues (minus the more manageable HR totals) with a David Freese (as a hitter) comparison for Schrock. One mainstream comp (I think, can’t remember where I first saw it) for Schrock is Kyle Seager. I like that comparison not only because it’s a decent enough lens to view Schrock as a prospect (again, however, I don’t think the power expectations fit – that’s something of a trend here), but also because it’s yet another excuse to talk about my appreciation for Kyle Seager. I’ve said a lot of inane stuff at this site over the years, but one of the few strokes of competency came back in March of 2009…

Seager’s well-rounded game (great plate discipline, slightly above-average power, good baserunner, high contact rate) make him a personal favorite of mine and as good a bet as any college hitter to settle in to a long career as a league average (at least) big leaguer.

My only regret is not going in harder back then when I knew Seager was going to be really good. I saw him play up close literally dozens of times during his time at North Carolina and a little nagging voice was always in my head telling me he was a better player than his far more famous teammate Dustin Ackley. I think if I had the guts (and, to a point, knowledge) that I now have back then, I would have at least given a few moments of honest consideration for putting Seager over Ackley on one of my all-important lists. Consideration would not have led to actually acting on it because Ackley was Ackley. That brings us full circle and gets me back to a far more comfortable place where I can talk about my misses rather than my hits: I absolutely LOVED Ackley, so, you know, win some lose some, right?

I’ve used Kyle Seager as a comp a few times in the past, for what it’s worth. The first was Brad Miller (“Seager with more defensive upside”), then it was Matt Reynolds (“a player in-between Seager and Chase Headley is a realistic ceiling”), and finally, one I completely forgot I wrote about even though it was published less than three months ago, came Clemson JR SS Tyler Krieger (“some scouting similarities between the two”). Neither the Miller nor the Reynolds examples make me cringe in hindsight, so I don’t feel too badly about going to the Kyle Seager comp well as often as I do. It’s been pretty good to me so far.

All that said, I’m not sure I’m completely on board with the Schrock/Seager comparison. I liken him more to a Mark Ellis type of hitter capable of giving you more or less league average production at the plate while making up the difference as needed with smart base running and steady defense. That’s an everyday player in the big leagues. Interesting to note that Miller (taken with pick 62), Reynolds (71), and Seager (82) were all off the board around the same range on draft day. That could very well be the window that Schrock (and perhaps Krieger) find themselves taken in this June. Getting a potential regular at second base with a late-second/early-third round pick would make any team really happy.

From the second-to-last day of 2014…

I’m sky high on Houston JR C Ian Rice, a transfer by way of Chipola who can really, really hit. If he shows enough behind the plate to convince teams he’s a catcher long-term (as I believe), there’s no telling how high he could rise by June. It’s just a hair too early to start stacking up prospects by position, but I’m very sure Rice will wind up higher on my board at that spot than anywhere else on the internet.

Nothing has changed since then to move me off my strong positive feelings towards Rice. If anything, I like him even more after hearing some positive things about his glove through the early stage of the college season. Now it’s time to kick back and wait until the rest of the draft internet catches up to how good Rice really is. While we wait for the world to recognize my brilliance, let’s kill some time with a quick tangent. The nice thing about liking a guy more than the consensus goes back to the buzz word you hear during every draft in every sport: value.

Value is a damn near impossible concept to pin down as it relates to an event as large and as filled with unknowns as the MLB Draft. I’ve always tried to avoid being overly critical of a team “overdrafting” a player because of the huge amount of uncertainty that exists when you’re working at an information deficit inherent with being privy to only one board (your own) yet simultaneously working around twenty-nine often non-rational actors on draft day. Even if you think you have some faint idea how other teams may have their boards lined up in the early going of a draft, that advantage only lasts so long. From the outside looking in we know even less. That’s one of the frustrating yet freeing things about being an outsider to the draft process.

If all the expert sites (BA, D1, PG, BP, ESPN, Fangraphs, etc.) have a player ranked in the fifties but he goes in the teens, the first instinct is to point, laugh, and declare the drafting team – not to appeal to authority or anything, but isn’t it crazy that the one collective group here with far more information than any of those outlets and way more on the line if they mess up such a big decision is the one we assume is wrong? — guilty of overdrafting the prospect. All of those major outlets (BA, PG, and likely the new-ish D1) have a ton of resources and arguably as much (if not more) of a league-wide feel for what draft boards could look like, so when they stack their final boards pre-draft it does serve a purpose. Nothing, of course, is written in stone.

My example from last year was Cole Tucker (who I’d like to preemptively note is an outstanding baseball player and very worthy early round draft prospect) going 24th to Pittsburgh. If I was misguidedly put in charge of a team’s draft, I would not have had a first round grade on Tucker. Baseball America, to use just one readily available source, had him at 84th overall heading into the draft. Their ranking was no more or less right or wrong than Pittsburgh’s. Player valuation is all over the place when it comes to amateur talent, as it should be. More to the value point, however, is the fact that Pittsburgh didn’t pick again until 39. If you really valued Tucker and believed the odds markedly decreased on him being available with that later pick, it’s worth it to “overdraft” your guy because the risk of losing him entirely is far more painful than getting your second choices at 24 and 39.

I’m as guilty as anybody (at times) of getting hung up on certain players that I hope my favorite team drafts (or avoids) in all the sports that matter to me. For example, I know far less about hockey than any other major sport, but if my hometown team passes up the guy I wanted them to draft in favor of some nobody, I’m going to react negatively. The fact that my research on both the guy I wanted them to draft and the nobody adds up to a grand total of fifteen combined minutes of reading whatever pre-draft coverage pops up first on Google (hopefully not from a site full of made-up scout quotes that the author didn’t even bother try to disguise in an original voice…not saying this happens in baseball, except that it does, it stinks, and I guess that’s how you get ahead [well, that and sucking up to writers on Twitter] at certain unnamed companies) and/or the hundreds (!) of seconds I’ll spend YouTube scouting (even though I know nothing beyond the very basics of the sport) is beside the point. Everybody wants to be an expert on draft day. So many opinions get thrown around on such highly speculative topics that just hitting on one correct scouting assessment has the positive impact of negating the dozens of misinformed, wrong-headed nonsense spewed all day. I support having the conviction to ride or die with your own personal draft rankings, but being snarky and chiding a team for overdrafting a player based solely on what you think was best for them without considering an alternate viewpoint feels unnecessarily parochial and naïve.

So, I hope Ian Rice receives his proper due as a draft prospect between now and June. If not, then I hope that the team I grew up with or a team that I’m assisting in draft coverage is able to take him later than I feel his skills deserve. That’s value, baby. In terms of draft stock he reminds me a little bit of an inverse version former Ole Miss and LSU-Eunice catcher Stuart Turner, who was known more for his glove than his bat. Turner hit enough to go in the third round (pick 78) to Minnesota in 2013. I see no reason why Rice can’t do the same. Another comparable prospect and player (minus handedness as a batter) is fellow 2013 draft pick (53rd overall) Andrew Knapp out of Cal. It would take Rice exceeding even my own sky high expectations to wind up in that draft range, but that’s why they play the games, right?

* I don’t include batting lines for scouting comps to create any unnecessary expectations for these players – it’s hard enough to compare any individual human being to another, let alone one ballplayer in the midst of a historic, “special vitamin” fueled era of offense to another in a far more muted offensive environment – but to give a reference point that highlights one possible viable outcome.

2015 MLB Draft Prospects – Houston

JR OF Kyle Survance (2015)
rJR OF Ashford Fulmer (2015)
SR OF Michael Pyeatt (2015)
JR 3B/1B Justin Montemayor (2015)
JR 2B Josh Vidales (2015)
JR C Ian Rice (2015)
JR RHP Patrick Weigel (2015)
SR RHP Aaron Garza (2015)
JR RHP Jacob Lemoine (2015)
SR RHP David Longville (2015)
SR RHP Jared Robinson (2015)
SR LHP Matt Locus (2015)
JR RHP Bubba Maxwell (2015)
SO 3B Connor Hollis (2016)
SO RHP Andrew Lantrip (2016)
SO RHP Marshall Kasowski (2016)
SO 3B Jordan Strading (2016)
FR INF Connor Wong (2017)

Houston returns three outfielders who all could get a shot at the pros come June. JR OF Kyle Survance is the best of the trio. His power is limited, but his speed and defense should keep him employed for at least a few years. If it clicks for him, it’s a big league skill set. rJR OF Ashford Fulmer is the most confounding player of the three. You could argue for his tools over Survance’s (very close call there, though I’m admittedly lower on Survance than most), but his average or better raw power hasn’t shown up in games yet while his overly aggressive approach leaves something to be desired. What SR OF Michael Pyeatt lacks in raw tools, he almost makes up for in baseball IQ. I have no feel on how teams currently feel about him — if they have a strong emotion on him either way — but he strikes me as the classic undersized battler who will grind out at bats and play beyond his physical limitations. I’d rank them as I discussed them (Survance, Fulmer, Pyeatt, with decent-sized gaps between each), but all three are draftable talents.

JR 3B/1B Justin Montemayor certainly looks the part, but, like Fulmer, he’s a young hitter who has been too aggressive at the plate for his own good to this point. I wish JR 2B Josh Vidales had even a little bit of power (.327 and .306 slugging the past two seasons) because his approach (88 BB/51 K career), defense (plus) and speed (26/34 SB career, not a burner but picks his spots really well) all rate high enough to be an entertaining prospect to follow professionally. The fact that he’s currently seen as a second base or bust (though, again, he’s fantastic there) defensive prospect works against him, though I wonder — I honestly don’t know — if that’s something he can change minds about this spring. If he could be trusted on the left side of the infield, then we’re talking a strong potential utility future, even without the power. For all his flaws, I’d still want him to be a member of my organization.

All of those players are established big time college baseball players; the fewest number of career at bats for any one of them is still over 300. The Cougar hitter I think has the best chance to be a quality pro (or at least the 1a to Survance’s 1b), however, is a guy without the same kind of major college track record. I’m sky high on JR C Ian Rice, a transfer by way of Chipola who can really, really hit. If he shows enough behind the plate to convince teams he’s a catcher long-term (as I do), there’s no telling how high he could rise by June. It’s just a hair too early to start stacking up prospects by position, but I’m very sure Rice will wind up higher on my board at that spot than anywhere else on the internet.

The two biggest arms on the staff belong to JR RHPs Jacob Lemoine and Patrick Weigel. The imposing pair combine big fastballs (both 88-94, peaking up near 96/97) with big frames (6-5, 220 for Lemoine and 6-6, 220 for Weigel). Lemoine’s big strength is his hard mid-80s slider, an average or better pitch at present with the chance to be a consistent plus offering in time. Weigel’s big weakness is his control. He walked over 7 batters per nine in his one year of big conference college ball at Pacific before upping that number to over one batter per inning at Oxnard CC last year. That’s scary. Even at his best, like last season when he struck out 12.39 batters per nine in 61 innings, he’s what could charitably be called “effectively wild.” In a way, Weigel is a tiny bit like the pitching version of Rice. Both are largely unproven talents with serious upside. We’ll have to wait and see as to how far along the well-traveled Weigel’s command and control (both need work) have developed, but the raw stuff is top two round quality. Lemoine is a more proven commodity after having spent two seasons putting up numbers ranging from solid (2013) to very good (2014) right here at Houston. If he takes that next step in terms of performance, it’s no stretch to envision him as a mid- to late-first round pick, especially if teams look at him as a starting pitcher going forward. I think his rapidly improving changeup and strong ground ball tendencies (allegedly…I have yet to check the numbers myself, but I will) give him a better than average shot at remaining in the rotation professionally. Both players have the potential to go very high this June, something that should come as no surprise in a sport that will always value power arms and power bats above most else.

SR RHP Aaron Garza is an excellent college pitcher who may not miss enough bats to be anything more than an excellent college pitcher. His consistent success at this level is pretty damn impressive considering said inability to miss bats (he’s gone from K/9’s of 6ish to 5ish to 4ish over the past three seasons, not exactly an inspiring trend) and his stuff is at least a little intriguing (CB, SL, and CU can all be throw for strikes AND flash above-average or better on any given day), so maybe he’s a whole is greater than the sum of parts kind of pitcher. The short fastball (mid- to upper-80s, 90 peak) is going to be held against him, but his secondaries, command, size (6-4, 200) and continued mastery of college competition against all logical odds demands some attention. Every year I do my best to track GB% for certain pitchers, and Garza could be a good candidate for this year’s exercise. I’m not sure what else we can attribute to his consistent run of success without being able to strike people out. Even his biggest fan wouldn’t call him a serious top five round pitching prospect, but he’s a fascinating player all the same. I know little to nothing about SR RHP Jared Robinson and JR RHP Bubba Maxwell, but the pair combined to strike out almost a batter per inning last season (61 K in 71.2 IP) with good control and shiny ERA’s. Both are undersized righthanded pitchers, so who knows what the future holds. SO RHP Marshall Kasowski is one to watch for the class of 2016.