The Baseball Draft Report

Home » Posts tagged 'Hayden White'

Tag Archives: Hayden White

2016 MLB Draft Follow Lists – Ohio Valley

It may just be me, but I’m starting to detect a trend towards hitters over pitchers in these conference prospect lists so far. This comes as a surprise as I would have told anybody who would listen – like my dog, if I had one – that this year’s college pitching group, on the whole, represented one of the strengths of the draft class. I don’t think that was a “wrong” first impression per se — going back through the archives over the past two weeks sees positive things written about Matt Crohan, Parker Bean, Andre Scrubb, Eric Lauer, Nick Deeg, Zach Plesac, Keegan Akin, Aaron Civale, Bailey Ober, and Dustin Hunt, among others – but more of a testament to the kind of high-end potential hitters that could be found in the draft’s mid- to late-rounds for teams willing to look a bit deeper into what college ball has to offer. In an effort to reverse this trend, here’s a lot of words about the Ohio Valley’s best pitchers…followed by slightly less words about the conference’s top hitters. Seems only right.

If you like senior-sign pitchers, then you’ll love what the Ohio Valley has in store in 2016. The presence of eight consecutive seniors at the top of these pitching rankings is fascinating to me for a couple of reasons. First, I didn’t realize I had done it until just this very moment; if anything, I make a conscious effort to settle most of my prospect ties by siding with the younger guy (admittedly less important with pitchers than hitters, at least in my estimation), so seeing the run of seniors really threw me off. If you’ll indulge me in a little self-scouting, I think what happened here was a lack of informational depth on my end about some of the younger arms in the conference. When faced with less data to work with, I went with the guys with longer track records who I knew better as prospects. I don’t think this is a great way to do business, but it’s one of the compromises I have to make when ranking players: giving preferential treatment to players with more data is far from ideal yet any realistic attempt to cover an entire country’s worth of amateur prospects (and Canada/Puerto Rico) with an unpaid staff of one necessitates some cutting of corners.

More information about Alex Robles’s fastball could have bumped him up the rankings considering how much I like his ability to change speeds and overall athleticism. If I had a better feel for whether Patrick McGuff’s control issues were correctable, he could be higher. Updated reports about the trio of Southeast Missouri State juniors (Justin Murphy, Clay Chandler, Robert Beltran) might have given me more confidence to shoot them up the board a couple spots. I did the best I could with the information that I could compile, but that nagging thought that I could have done more to fairly represent the true pro prospects of some of these hard-working players is what keeps me up some nights.

Anyway, the eight seniors at the top all have flashed pro ability at one time or another during their college careers. Matt Anderson has had some ugly ERAs to date, but he consistently misses bats with his impressive three-pitch mix (88-92 FB, CU that flashes plus, average or better breaking ball). Tyler Keele can run it up to 94 with a good yet inconsistent curve, Aaron Quillen is a steady (88-92 FB, solid command) righthanded arm out of central casting, and PJ Schuster leans on an above-average change to stay one step ahead of hitters. Then you’ve got Joey Lucchesi with a good fastball (88-92) coming in with deception from the left side, the wild Andrew Bramley who can throw two effective breaking balls, Jared Carkuff and his ready for the bullpen fastball/slider combo, and Matt Wivinis, the transfer from Kansas State who will sink and cut his fastball all while flashing an above-average slider of his own.

The hitters are led by Logan Gray, a tooled up infielder with a good chance at sticking at short professionally. I’m excited by his raw power (average or better), defensive upside, serious wheels, and a rapidly improving approach. Right behind Gray is Tyler Lawrence, the catcher out of Murray State. He’s improved enough defensively over the years to be a near-certainty to stick behind the plate and his approach as a hitter separates him from many (but not all) of his mid-major catching peers. I’m a big fan. If Lawrence does it do it for you (he should), then perhaps a different Tyler will get your attention. Tyler Walsh and Tyler Fullerton, both of Belmont, go about things differently, but both wind up as interesting pro prospects. Walsh, the 6-5, 200 pound plus runner, is a rangy shortstop with significant upside if he can put it all together his junior season. Fullerton, the steady glove with deceptive pop in his 5-9, 175 pound frame, is already coming off a monster junior year, so a layman like me can only wonder what more he needs to do to get noticed by pro teams this spring. Maybe I’m overrating his glove as I’ve heard at least average at second with a fallback as a quality outfielder, but maybe that’s too rich. Even still, I can’t in good conscience deny a hitter who has produced like he has so far.

I’m not sure Ridge Smith is a catcher over the long haul, but he’s got the athleticism to give it a go as a pro. Failing that, he could still put that athleticism (and above-average speed) to good use at either third or an outfield spot. In a draft lacking in big-time power, Keaton Wright stands out as one of the more intriguing sluggers. Feedback I’ve gotten say he’s more 2017 senior-sign to track than a real 2016 draft threat, but I’m throwing caution to the wind with the aggressive ranking. Power has that kind of effect on me, I guess. The placement of Demetre Taylor, Mandy Alvarez, and Kyle Nowlin in the top ten reflects that position as well. When a guy like Nowlin (coming off a .326/.438/.690 junior season) ranks ninth on a list of hitters, then you can assume good things about a conference’s overall depth.

Hitters

  1. Austin Peay State JR SS/3B Logan Gray
  2. Murray State JR C Tyler Lawrence
  3. Belmont JR SS Tyler Walsh
  4. Belmont SR 2B/OF Tyler Fullerton
  5. Austin Peay State JR C/3B Ridge Smith
  6. Southern Illinois Edwardsville JR 1B Keaton Wright
  7. Eastern Illinois rSR OF/1B Demetre Taylor
  8. Eastern Kentucky SR 3B/1B Mandy Alvarez
  9. Eastern Kentucky SR OF Kyle Nowlin
  10. Austin Peay State JR 2B Garrett Copeland
  11. Jacksonville State SO C Hayden White
  12. Morehead State rJR 3B Alex Stephens
  13. Tennessee Tech rJR OF Jake Rowland
  14. Eastern Kentucky SR SS/2B Doug Teegarden
  15. Southeast Missouri State JR OF Dan Holst
  16. Southern Illinois Edwardsville JR 1B/OF Jared McCunn
  17. Tennessee-Martin rSO OF Collin Edwards
  18. Southeast Missouri State SR 1B/OF Ryan Rippee
  19. Jacksonville State SR 1B Paschal Petrongolo
  20. Southeast Missouri State SR SS Branden Boggetto
  21. Belmont JR C Nick Egli
  22. Tennessee-Martin JR C/OF Tanner Wessling
  23. Eastern Kentucky SR OF TJ Alas
  24. Austin Peay State JR 1B Dre Gleason
  25. Morehead State JR OF Ryan Kent
  26. Austin Peay State JR OF Cayce Bredlau
  27. Austin Peay State JR OF Chase Hamilton
  28. Southeast Missouri State SR 3B/OF Hunter Leeper
  29. Southeast Missouri State SR C/1B Garrett Gandolfo
  30. Tennessee Tech JR OF Tyler Brazelton
  31. Eastern Kentucky JR 1B Ben Fisher
  32. Southeast Missouri State JR C Kylar Robertson
  33. Jacksonville State SR OF Elliot McCummings
  34. Jacksonville State SR 1B Tyler Gamble
  35. Southeast Missouri State SR C Scott Mitchell
  36. Eastern Illinois SR C Jason Scholl
  37. Austin Peay State SR OF Josh Wilson
  38. Jacksonville State SR OF Paul Angel
  39. Austin Peay State SR OF Patrick Massoni
  40. Southeast Missouri State SR OF Clayton Evans
  41. Southern Illinois Edwardsville SR 2B/SS Skyler Geissinger
  42. Tennessee-Martin SR SS Matt Hirsch
  43. Jacksonville State SR OF/2B Gavin Golsan
  44. Eastern Kentucky JR OF Shea Sullivan
  45. Eastern Kentucky JR C Logan Starnes
  46. Tennessee Tech SR 2B/SS Jake Farr

Pitchers

  1. Morehead State SR RHP Matt Anderson
  2. Morehead State SR RHP Tyler Keele
  3. Belmont SR RHP Aaron Quillen
  4. Southern Illinois Edwardsville SR RHP PJ Schuster
  5. Southeast Missouri State SR LHP Joey Lucchesi
  6. Murray State SR RHP Andrew Bramley
  7. Austin Peay State SR RHP Jared Carkuff
  8. Eastern Illinois rSR RHP Matt Wivinis
  9. Eastern Kentucky JR LHP Alex Hamilton
  10. Austin Peay State JR RHP/3B Alex Robles
  11. Morehead State JR RHP Patrick McGuff
  12. Southern Illinois Edwardsville SR RHP Jarrett Bednar
  13. Morehead State rSR RHP Craig Pearcy
  14. Tennessee Tech SR RHP Trevor Maloney
  15. Tennessee Tech JR RHP Jake Usher
  16. Southern Illinois Edwardsville JR RHP Connor Buenger
  17. Southeast Missouri State JR RHP Justin Murphy
  18. Southeast Missouri State JR RHP Clay Chandler
  19. Southeast Missouri State JR LHP Robert Beltran
  20. Murray State rSO RHP Tyler Anderson
  21. Jacksonville State JR RHP Graham Officer
  22. Jacksonville State rSO LHP Justin Hoyt
  23. Jacksonville State JR RHP/INF Joe McGuire
  24. Murray State SR RHP Cody Maerz
  25. Southeast Missouri State SR RHP Alex Siddle
  26. Jacksonville State SO RHP Jake Walsh
  27. Southeast Missouri State SR RHP Brady Wright
  28. Austin Peay State JR LHP Levi Primasing
  29. Murray State SR RHP Brad Boegel
  30. Tennessee-Martin SR RHP Patrick Bernard
  31. Belmont SR RHP Josh Tubbs
  32. Austin Peay State JR RHP Caleb Powell
  33. Belmont JR RHP Christopher Carroll
  34. Southern Illinois Edwardsville SR LHP Zach Malach

Austin Peay State

SR RHP Jared Carkuff (2016)
JR RHP Caleb Powell (2016)
SR RHP Keirce Kimbel (2016)
JR LHP Levi Primasing (2016)
JR RHP/3B Alex Robles (2016)
JR SS/3B Logan Gray (2016)
SR OF Josh Wilson (2016)
SR OF Patrick Massoni (2016)
SR OF Kyle Blackburn (2016)
JR C/3B Ridge Smith (2016)
JR 1B Dre Gleason (2016)
JR 2B Garrett Copeland (2016)
JR OF Cayce Bredlau (2016)
JR OF Chase Hamilton (2016)
SR OF Wesley Purcell (2016)
SR SS Clayton Smithson (2016)
SO LHP Mike Costanzo (2017)
SO LHP John Sparks (2017)
SO LHP Zach Neff (2017)
SO SS Imani Willis (2017)
SO C TJ Marik (2017)
FR INF Parker Phillips (2018)

High Priority Follows: Jared Carkuff, Caleb Powell, Levi Primasing, Alex Robles, Logan Gray, Josh Wilson, Patrick Massoni, Ridge Smith, Dre Gleason, Garrett Copeland, Cayce Bredlau, Chase Hamilton

Belmont

SR RHP Aaron Quillen (2016)
SR RHP Josh Tubbs (2016)
JR RHP Christopher Carroll (2016)
rJR RHP/OF Dom Veltri (2016)
SR 2B/OF Tyler Fullerton (2016)
JR C/OF Clay Payne (2016)
JR C Nick Egli (2016)
JR SS Tyler Walsh (2016)
SR C Desi Ammonds (2016)
JR OF Brennan Washington (2016)
JR 1B Drake Byrd (2016)
SO RHP Tyler Vaughn (2017)
SO RHP Alex Ward (2017)
SO RHP Connor Etheridge (2017)
FR RHP Dylan King (2018)
FR RHP Casey Queener (2018)
FR LHP Brandon Liskey (2018)
FR RHP/OF Austin Kzreminski (2018)

High Priority Follows: Aaron Quillen, Josh Tubbs, Dom Veltri, Tyler Fullerton, Clay Payne, Nick Egli, Tyler Walsh, Desi Ammonds, Drake Byrd

Eastern Illinois

rSR RHP Matt Wivinis (2016)
SR RHP Jake Johansmeier (2016)
SR RHP Brendon Allen (2016)
JR RHP Chase Thurston (2016)
rSR OF/1B Demetre Taylor (2016)
SR 2B Mitch Gasbarro (2016)
SR C Jason Scholl (2016)
rSO OF Frankie Perrone (2016)
SO RHP Ben Hughes (2017)
SO RHP Luke Dietz (2017)
SO OF Joe Duncan (2017)
SO 1B/OF Bobby Wenthe (2017)
FR SS Nick Maton (2018)
FR 2B Dane Toppel (2018)
FR 3B Jimmy Govern (2018)

High Priority Follows: Matt Wivinis, Chase Thurston, Demetre Taylor, Mitch Gasbarro, Jason Scholl

Eastern Kentucky

JR LHP Alex Hamilton (2016)
SR LHP Luke McGee (2016)
JR OF/RHP Taylor Blair (2016)
SR OF Kyle Nowlin (2016)
SR 3B/1B Mandy Alvarez (2016)
SR SS/2B Doug Teegarden (2016)
SR OF TJ Alas (2016)
SR 2B/3B Luke Wurzelbacher (2016)
JR 1B Ben Fisher (2016)
JR OF Shea Sullivan (2016)
JR C Logan Starnes (2016)
JR 2B Cole Warrenfeltz (2016)
SO RHP Aaron Ochsenbein (2017)

High Priority Follows: Alex Hamilton, Taylor Blair, Kyle Nowlin, Mandy Alvarez, Doug Teegarden, TJ Alas, Luke Wurzelbacher, Ben Fisher, Shea Sullivan, Logan Starnes

Jacksonville State

JR RHP Graham Officer (2016)
rSO LHP Justin Hoyt (2016)
SO RHP Jake Walsh (2016)
JR RHP Michael McCreless (2016)
JR LHP Jesse Fry (2016)
JR RHP/INF Joe McGuire (2016)
SR 1B Paschal Petrongolo (2016)
SR OF Elliot McCummings (2016)
SR 1B Tyler Gamble (2016)
SR OF Paul Angel (2016)
SR OF/2B Gavin Golsan (2016)
JR OF Peyton Williams (2016)
JR INF Josh Bobo (2016)
SO C Hayden White (2016)
SO INF Clayton Daniel (2016)
SO INF Tyler Hawthorne (2016)
SO RHP Grant Chandler (2017)
SO LHP Jack Pierce (2017)
FR LHP Derrick Adams (2018)

High Priority Follows: Graham Officer, Justin Hoyt, Jake Walsh, Michael McCreless, Jesse Fry, Joe McGuire, Paschal Petrongolo, Elliot McCummings, Tyler Gamble, Paul Angel, Gavin Golsan, Peyton Williams, Hayden White, Clayton Daniel, Tyler Hawthorne

Morehead State

SR RHP Matt Anderson (2016)
SR RHP Tyler Keele (2016)
JR RHP Patrick McGuff (2016)
rSR RHP Craig Pearcy (2016)
JR RHP Luke Humphreys (2016)
JR LHP Cable Wright (2016)
rJR 3B Alex Stephens (2016)
JR C Jimmy Wright (2016)
rJR OF Michael Patrick (2016)
JR 1B Jesus Carrera (2016)
JR OF Ryan Kent (2016)
SO RHP David Calderon (2017)
SO RHP Brent Stoneking (2017)
SO LHP Aaron Leasher (2017)
SO C Tyler Niemann (2017)
SO 2B Braxton Morris (2017)
FR SS Reid Leonard (2018)
FR C Hunter Fain (2018)
FR INF Trevor Snyder (2018)

High Priority Follows: Matt Anderson, Tyler Keele, Patrick McGuff, Craig Pearcy, Luke Humphreys, Cable Wright, Alex Stephens, Ryan Kent

Murray State

SR RHP Andrew Bramley (2016)
SR RHP Brad Boegel (2016)
SR LHP Sheldon Baxter (2016)
SR RHP Cody Maerz (2016)
SR RHP John Lollar (2016)
rSO RHP Tyler Anderson (2016)
JR C Tyler Lawrence (2016)
JR OF Brandon Gutzler (2016)
JR SS Caleb Hicks (2016)
SR 2B Nick Moore (2016)
rJR INF Matthew Johnson (2016)
SO 3B/C Kipp Moore (2017)

High Priority Follows: Andrew Bramley, Brad Boegel, Cody Maerz, Tyler Anderson, Tyler Lawrence, Nick Moore

Southern Illinois Edwardsville

JR RHP Connor Buenger (2016)
SR RHP Jarrett Bednar (2016)
SR LHP Zach Malach (2016)
SR RHP Ryan Agnitsch (2016)
SR RHP PJ Schuster (2016)
JR 1B/OF Jared McCunn (2016)
JR C Kailer Smith (2016)
SR 2B/SS Skyler Geissinger (2016)
SR C Zach Little (2016)
JR 3B Jacob Stewart (2016)
JR 2B Alec Skender (2016)
JR 1B Keaton Wright (2016)
JR OF Austin Verschoore (2016)
SO OF Dustin Woodcock (2017)
SO INF Mario Tursi (2017)
FR RHP Danny Ehrsam (2018)
FR OF Eric Giltz (2018)

High Priority Follows: Connor Buenger, Jarrett Bednar, Zach Malach, PJ Schuster, Jared McCunn, Kailer Smith, Skyler Geissinger, Jacob Stewart, Keaton Wright

Southeast Missouri State

JR RHP Clay Chandler (2016)
JR LHP Robert Beltran (2016)
JR RHP Justin Murphy (2016)
SR RHP Alex Siddle (2016)
SR RHP Brady Wright (2016)
SR LHP Joey Lucchesi (2016)
SR RHP Jacob Lawrence (2016)
rSR RHP/OF Cody Spanberger (2016)
JR OF Dan Holst (2016)
SR 1B/OF Ryan Rippee (2016)
SR C/1B Garrett Gandolfo (2016)
SR SS Branden Boggetto (2016)
SR C Scott Mitchell (2016)
SR SS Andy Lack (2016)
SR OF Clayton Evans (2016)
SR 3B/OF Hunter Leeper (2016)
JR C Kylar Robertson (2016)
SO RHP Matthew Wade (2017)
SO RHP Zach Moore (2017)
SO 2B/SS Trevor Ezell (2017)
FR LHP Daniel Bergtholdt (2018)

High Priority Follows: Clay Chandler, Robert Beltran, Justin Murphy, Alex Siddle, Brady Wright, Joey Lucchesi, Jacob Lawrence, Dan Holst, Ryan Rippee, Garrett Gandolfo, Branden Boggetto, Scott Mitchell, Andy Lack, Clayton Evans, Hunter Leeper, Kylar Robertson

Tennessee Tech

SR RHP Trevor Maloney (2016)
SR RHP Kyle Godwin (2016)
rJR RHP Kit Fowler (2016)
JR RHP Jake Usher (2016)
JR RHP Evan Fraliex (2016)
rJR OF Jake Rowland (2016)
SR 2B/SS Jake Farr (2016)
JR OF Anthony El Chibani (2016)
JR OF Tyler Brazelton (2016)
rSO SS David Garza (2016)
SR 3B Josh Pankratz (2016)
SO RHP Travis Moths (2017)
SO RHP Will Gardner (2017)
SO 1B Chase Chambers (2017)
SO 1B Ryan Flick (2017)
SO INF Trevor Putzig (2017)
FR RHP Nick Osborne (2018)

High Priority Follows: Trevor Maloney, Kyle Godwin, Jake Usher, Jake Rowland, Jake Farr, Anthony El Chibani, Tyler Brazelton

Tennessee-Martin

SR RHP Patrick Bernard (2016)
JR RHP Alex Evans (2016)
SR OF Andrew Castillo (2016)
JR C/OF Tanner Wessling (2016)
SR 1B/OF Austin Taylor (2016)
SR SS Matt Hirsch (2016)
JR 1B Ryan Helgren (2016)
JR SS Josh Hauser (2016)
rSO OF Collin Edwards (2016)
SO RHP Dillon Symon (2017)
rFR LHP Dom Bazzani (2017)

High Priority Follows: Patrick Bernard, Andrew Castillo, Tanner Wessling, Austin Taylor, Matt Hirsch, Collin Edwards

Big South 2015 MLB Draft All-Prospect Team

High Point SR C Spencer Angelis
Charleston Southern SR 1B Chase Shelton
Radford SR 2B Josh Gardiner
Coastal Carolina JR 3B Zach Remillard
Liberty JR SS Dalton Britt
Campbell JR OF Cedric Mullins
Longwood JR OF Kyri Washington
Liberty rSR OF Nick Paxton

Liberty SR RHP Ashton Perritt
Longwood SR RHP Aaron Myers
Radford JR LHP Michael Boyle
High Point SR RHP Conor Lourey
Coastal Carolina JR LHP Andrew Schorr

Going with a relative unknown like JR C Casey Schroeder (Coastal Carolina) over a proven bat like SR C Spencer Angelis (High Point) feels like a bit of a boom/bust prognostication at this point, but faith in the Kentucky transfers hit tool, athleticism, and slow yet steady defensive progression wins the day. The overall group of senior catchers in the conference – Angelis, Josh Spano (High Point), Josh Reavis (Radford), Andrew Widell (Charleston Southern) – present a unique and talented collection of potential money-saving signings for teams looking to cut costs while adding a potentially useful minor league contributor (everybody needs catching) with big league backup catching upside.

SR 1B/LHP Chase Shelton (Charleston Southern) might be a better fit in the outfield – he certainly has the arm for it – but that might be asking a bit too much out of a 6-5, 230 pound man. His bat looks pretty good either way. SR 1B Alex Close (Liberty) has been a favorite for some time – not a FAVORITE, but a favorite – because of his playable present power. If an area guy can sell his bosses on Close as a potential 1B/3B/C hybrid, then he could go higher than even I think. The breakout season for JR 3B Zach Remillard (Coastal Carolina) is coming. It has to be since it hasn’t happened yet. That’s infallible logic if I’ve ever heard it. Remillard is a really well-rounded talent who sometimes gets himself in trouble by expanding the zone and trying to do too much at the plate. If he can just ease up just a touch with his overly aggressive approach, then he could begin to produce enough overall offensive value to project as a potential regular at the hot corner. The more realistic forecast is as an offense-first utility player capable of playing 1B, 2B, 3B, and maybe the outfield corners. His teammate at Coastal Carolina, JR 3B/C Tyler Chadwick could eventually play a similar role but with even more positions (like, all of them) added to the mix. He might work better as a 2016 senior sign since many big league teams will ding him because of his lack of size (5-9, 180), but he’s handled the bat well when given a shot and the defensive versatility makes him an intriguing “hole-plugger” for an organization with a lot of minor league moving parts.

I’m not particularly enamored by any of the Big South 2015 shortstops at this point. Enough good things have been said about JR SS Dalton Britt (Liberty) that he takes the top spot over SR SS Ryan Hodge (Gardner-Webb), though I think both profile best as utility infielders/minor league depth in the long run. Britt has the better shot to change that perception if he can find a way to start doing some of the necessary secondary things offensively (pop, patience, speed) beyond hitting for average. The best middle infield prospect in the conference is SR 2B/OF Josh Gardiner (Radford), a strong athlete who does those secondary offensive things just well enough to profile as a sleeper big league talent. JR 2B Connor Owings (Coastal Carolina) could pass him by with a big junior year on the strength of his above-average hit tool.

JR OF Kyri Washington has as much a claim to the top position player spot in his conference as just about any prospect in the country. Evaluating amateur talent is sometimes only as hard as we make it. Your eyes eventually settle into seeing predictable patterns in the players you see and you find yourself getting unusually adept at recognizing the kind of ability that will become universally lauded as pro-caliber. “Always bet on ______” is more than just a snappy one-off line, but a mantra that serves those who watch a disproportionate amount of baseball well as they assess a prospect’s future. In Washington’s case, his athleticism and raw power qualify as abilities that stack up against almost any current big league player. If those are the traits that you value highly – and, really, who doesn’t? – then Washington is just about as good as it gets in college ball this year.

Conversely, anybody who watches a ton of amateur ball can quickly realize the holes in a mega-talented player’s game. If you’re an “always bet on the hit tool, including the consistent ability to make contact, the capacity to make adjustments within an at bat (or at least a game), and a seemingly innate overall feel for the strike zone and resourcefulness to spit on sometimes-strikes that he can’t do anything with,” well, then you might have some trepidation in championing a player who otherwise has first round tools. I’m on the fence as to whether or not how much of what we consider to fall under the plate discipline/approach to hitting umbrella can be taught, but I do believe that Washington is at the age in his baseball development when figuring it out – maybe not completely, but certainly to a degree – is well within the realm of possibility. That possibility on top of the prodigious raw power and plus athleticism is what makes the prospect of gambling on Washington so appealing. I get it. A comparison that I’ve heard and liked – though it admittedly stretches the limits of my personal firsthand baseball watching days – has stacked up Washington favorably to a young Richard Hidalgo.

With all that written on Washington, it seems only fair to spend at least a few words on the man ranked ahead of him. JR OF Cedric Mullins (Campbell) is a highly speculative pick on my end. I’ve never seen him, though, as I’ve said many times before, I’m not sure how much utility such a viewing would even bring. What I’ve heard about him, however, has been thrilling. Mullins has the chance to show premium tools as a defender in center (both range and arm) and on the base paths (plus speed and a great feel for the art of base stealing led to him going 55/59 on his career junior college attempts) this spring. He also brings a patient approach to hitting, both in how he happily accepts free passes (a walk doesn’t feel like such a passive thing when you know you’re taking second and maybe third once you are there) and works pitchers until he’s in counts favorable for fastball hunting. The only tool he ranks below Washington in is raw power, but, as covered above, the emphasis on the raw cannot be taken lightly. In terms of current functional power, the battle tightens quite a bit. It’s an imperfect comp for an imperfect world, but I can see Mullins approximating the value of another former junior college guy like Mallex Smith, though with a bit more pop and a fraction less speed.

One thing that stands out to me in my notes on SR RHP/OF Ashton Perritt (Liberty): “like him more than Aaron Brown.” Ignoring the fact that I don’t think Brown will ever hit enough to make his loud tools work – I much prefer him on the mound, but the Phillies never asked me – that’s still a nice little compliment. Whether I liked it or not (if it hasn’t come across yet, one last time: I really, really didn’t), the Pepperdine star showed enough to convince a team into selecting him with the 81st overall selection in last year’s draft. I suppose I’m not quite bold enough to predict the same draft outcome for the multi-talented Perritt, though I wouldn’t be surprised if a team fell in love with his talent as either a pitcher or hitter and took him earlier than the consensus industry opinion would have you think. I like him on the mound because he comes equipped with a relatively fresh arm capable of hitting the mid-90s,he throws two offspeed pitches with promise (82-84 split-CU and a separate quality low-80s breaking ball), and his athleticism is second to none in this year’s class of college pitching. That very same athleticism could convince a team to stick him in center, a position that would allow him to get the most out of his plus (some have it plus-plus) speed. Either way, he’s a good looking prospect and well worth seeing up close if you get the chance this spring.

The names that follow Perritt are a little less flashy, but no less promising. SR RHP Aaron Myers (Longwood) has gotten consistent results from day one thanks to an impressive blend of size (6-3, 225), pitchability, and stuff (88-92 sinking FB, average yet inconsistent CB, steadily improving CU that seems to get better every outing). JR LHP Michael Boyle (Radford) does man of the things successful young lefties do: spots an upper-80s FB (93 peak), leans on an impressive changeup, works from a deceptive delivery, and maintains good command of three pitches. SR RHP Conor Lourey might just qualify as flashy, but that assumes you’re into hard-throwing (94 peak) 6-7, 250 pound righthanders. JR LHP Andrew Schorr (Coastal Carolina) is a speculative addition, but what I’ve heard about his repertoire has me excited about his upcoming shot at D1 baseball.

Further down the line are names like SR RHP Heath Bowers (Campbell) and JR LHP Andrew Tomasovich (Charleston Southern). Bowers stands out to me for his fastball, a pitch that won’t wow you in terms of speed (mid- to upper-80s) but has enough sink to make good hitters make some really weak contact. I like Tomasovich for his funky lefthanded delivery that makes timing his stuff a task I’m glad I’ll never be asked to do. Mid-tier prospects like these guys need to find niches to survive in pro ball and both Bowers and Tomasovich seem up to the challenge.

2015 MLB Draft Talent – Hitting 

  1. Campbell JR OF Cedric Mullins
  2. Longwood JR OF Kyri Washington
  3. Radford SR 2B/OF Josh Gardiner
  4. Coastal Carolina JR 2B Connor Owings
  5. Coastal Carolina JR C Casey Schroeder
  6. High Point SR C/1B Spencer Angelis
  7. Coastal Carolina JR 3B Zach Remillard
  8. Liberty JR SS Dalton Britt
  9. Charleston Southern SR 1B/LHP Chase Shelton
  10. Liberty SR 1B Alex Close
  11. High Point SR C Josh Spano
  12. Coastal Carolina JR 3B/C Tyler Chadwick
  13. Radford SR 1B/3B Hunter Higgerson
  14. Liberty rSR OF Nick Paxton
  15. Radford SR OF Patrick Marshall
  16. UNC Asheville SR 3B/1B Hunter Bryant
  17. Gardner-Webb SR SS Ryan Hodge
  18. Radford rSR C Josh Reavis
  19. Charleston Southern SR C Andrew Widell
  20. Radford JR SS/OF Chris Coia
  21. Campbell rJR C Steven Leonard

2015 MLB Draft Talent – Pitching

  1. Liberty SR RHP/OF Ashton Perritt
  2. Longwood SR RHP Aaron Myers
  3. Radford JR LHP Michael Boyle
  4. High Point SR RHP Conor Lourey
  5. Coastal Carolina JR LHP Andrew Schorr
  6. Coastal Carolina JR RHP Mike Morrison
  7. Radford JR RHP Dylan Nelson
  8. Campbell SR RHP Heath Bowers
  9. Presbyterian SR LHP Beau Dees
  10. UNC Asheville JR RHP Corey Randall
  11. Charleston Southern JR LHP Andrew Tomasovich
  12. Coastal Carolina rJR RHP Tyler Poole
  13. Gardner-Webb SR RHP Matt Fraudin
  14. Coastal Carolina rJR RHP Patrick Corbett
  15. Liberty SR LHP Shawn Clowers
  16. Liberty SR RHP Carson Herndon
  17. Winthrop JR RHP Joey Strain
  18. Winthrop JR RHP Zach Sightler
  19. Liberty JR RHP Hayden White
  20. Longwood SR LHP Brandon Vick
  21. Coastal Carolina rSO RHP Alex Cunningham
  22. Gardner-Webb JR LHP Ryan Boelter
  23. High Point rJR RHP Scot Hoffman
  24. Presbyterian JR RHP David Sauer
  25. Coastal Carolina SR LHP Austin Kerr
  26. Gardner-Webb JR RHP Brad Haymes
  27. Radford JR RHP Ryan Meisinger
  28. Liberty SR LHP Jared Lyons
  29. Campbell SR RHP Bobby Thorson