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2016 MLB Draft Reviews – Arizona Diamondbacks

Top 500 Prospects Drafted by Arizona in 2016

42 – RHP Jon Duplantier
60 – OF Anfernee Grier
194 – C Gavin Stupienski
227 – RHP Curtis Taylor
255 – 2B Manny Jefferson
279 – C Andy Yerzy
366 – C Ryan January
392 – OF Connor Owings
410 – LHP Colin Poche

Complete List of 2016 Arizona Diamondbacks Draftees

1.39 – OF Anfernee Grier

You’d think three years of SEC experience would have me reevaluating my original high school comp for Anfernee Grier (60), but I keep coming back to Devon White every time I see him play. Maybe the body types are a bit off — Grier is plenty graceful, but doesn’t quite give off the same gazelle-like movements of a young White — but I think they two share plenty of traits that could translate to a similar professional upside. Even his doubters would have to admit that Grier has star upside if it all comes together as a pro. It might be rich for some in certain areas, but I think putting above-average future grades on all five of his tools isn’t crazy. Even if you knock a few tools down to average (hit, power, arm), he’s still got a chance to be an outstanding regular and long-term fixture in center field.

If you didn’t know much about Grier until now, then I can imagine you sitting there wondering how a guy with tools like his fell to the thirty-ninth overall pick. Here you go: the aforementioned high school evaluation on this site contained this line — “questionable approach biggest current impediment to success as pro” — which remains as true now as it did then. Grier is such a naturally gifted talented young hitter — his “lightning quick wrists” were also mentioned in that report — that at times his approach at the plate looks like what one might expect out of a hitter unfamiliar with not being able to hit everything even remotely near the plate hard and far. I’m not sure this is a mainstream enough topic to qualify it as a #hottake, but I’ve wondered at times when watching Grier if he was too gifted a hitter for his own good. The confidence he has as a hitter made him a great amateur, but could keep him from being a great pro. Grier will have to learn that just because he can hit almost any pitch in any count it doesn’t necessarily mean that he should. More so than most early-round college draftees, Grier’s pro development is going to hinge greatly on his receptiveness to pro instruction, to say nothing of the quality and patience of those doing the instructing.

Of course, any attempt to change Grier too much could move him away from what made his approach work for him in the first place. The real challenge for Grier and the Diamondbacks going forward will be finding a happy medium between his natural inclination to swing at anything close and a more patient, nuanced approach at the plate. If that can be achieved, Grier is a star. If not, I think there’s still enough in the way of physical talent here to suggest Grier will have a long, fruitful career as a speed/defense backup outfielder. With a high ceiling and reasonable floor, Grier is a quality prospect and deserving first round pick.

2.52 – C Andy Yerzy

I believe in Andy Yerzy (279) as a hitter. I don’t believe in him as a catcher. That puts him in a really tough spot as the former belief isn’t nearly as strong as the latter. Yerzy will hit, sure, but will it be enough for first base? The most honest answer is ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, but that’s not what you come here for. Forced to give a definitive answer on the long-term future of an 18-year-old hitter from York Mills Collegiate Institute in beautiful Ontario …I guess I’d take the easy way out and say he’s not likely to hit enough to hold down a job at first base at the highest level. That’s playing the percentages, after all. The honest answer remains the silly shrug. I don’t have nearly enough feel for Yerzy as a hitter — what I’ve seen and heard and read, I like — to give a more solid take on his future. I clearly love going on and on and on about players I think I have a good feel for — somebody on the internet recently dissed me as being “too wordy and authoritative,” so I guess that reputation as a know-it-all yakker precedes me — but I’d like to think I also know when to shut up about a guy I don’t have enough information on to give a meaningful opinion about. So I’m going to shut up now.

3.89 – RHP Jon Duplantier

“If Duplantier flops in the pros, I’m out on Rice pitchers forever,” was a thing written here back in April. It’s true. If Jon Duplantier (42) doesn’t make it due to either injury or reduced stuff caused from injury, then I’m swearing off Rice pitchers…until next June. If Duplantier does make it, however, then me calling this one of the best picks in the draft and arguably the best value of any drafted college arm will look pretty smart. On Duplantier from March 2016…

The good news for Rice is that their ace is very clearly the best pitching prospect in the conference. Jon Duplantier is awesome. There are only so many college baseball and draft writers out there and there are a ton of quality players to write about, but it still surprises me that Duplantier has managed to go (kind of) under the radar this spring. I mean, of course Duplantier has been written about plenty and he’s regarded by almost anybody who matters as one of the top college arms in this class – not to mention I’m guilty of not writing about him until now myself – but it still feels like we could all be doing more to spread the word about how good he really is. Here’s what I wrote about him in his draft capsule last year…

175. Rice SO RHP Jon Duplantier: 87-94 FB, 95 peak; good CU; good 73-75 CB; average 82-85 SL, flashes above-average when harder; good command; great athlete; fascinating draft case study as a hugely overlooked injured arm that one scout described to me as “every bit as good as Dillon Tate when on” and another said his injury was a “blessing in disguise” because it saved him from further abuse at the hands of Coach Graham; 6-4, 210 pounds

His fastball has since topped out as high as 97-98 and more consistently sits in the mid- to upper-band of that velocity range (90-94). His command has continued to improve and his breaking balls are both showing more consistency. I’ve heard his change has backed up some – more of a future average pitch at 82-84 than anything – but seeing as that’s just one of three usable offspeed pitches, it’s not the end of the world. Duplantier is big, athletic, and getting better by the day. I don’t know if that all adds up to a first round selection in this class, but it is damn close if not.

Duplantier finished his college season ranked 42nd on my board. The draft’s first round went 41 picks. Damn close to a first round pick indeed. I’m still hopeful that his history of nagging injuries turns out to be more of a blessing in disguise we all look back on and laugh about rather than an ongoing issue that plagues him in pro ball. Get him healthy, get him working on refining his offspeed stuff (average 82-84 CU, average 82-85 SL, average mid-70s CB), get him the reps he’ll need to bump that fastball (87-95, 98 peak) command up a grade, and watch him work. I called it “sneaky top of the rotation upside” back in April, and I think some of that is still there with Duplantier. It’s aggressive, I know, but I believe. There’s just something about pitchers from Rice that I like…

4.119 – RHP Curtis Taylor

I’m really excited to watch Curtis Taylor (227) pitch in the pros. If ninth round pick Tommy Eveld (we’ll get to him) is my Platonic Ideal of what a ninth round pick college pitcher should look like, then Taylor fits the bill for the fourth round. More accurately, he’s what I want in any college pitcher outside of the first few picks in the draft. Size (6-5, 210), projection (cold weather factor), present velocity (90-94, 96 peak), offspeed with promise (slider and splitter), results (11.10 K/9 and 2.16 BB/9 in 91.2 IP at the University of British Columbia), and ground balls (around 60% in his debut)…the guy checks every box. There’s number two starter upside here with Taylor.

5.149 – 3B Joey Rose

I heard really good college player and potential 2019 first day pick when asking around about Joey Rose for much of the spring. There’s plenty to like such as his easy above-average righthanded power and above-average arm strength at the hot corner, but he’s a long way away from what he could be. I still like Arizona taking a shot on him here in the fifth round. If you think he could be a first round pick in 2019, then why not grab him well before that in a much lower round? Why let college ball have all the fun developing him when you can do it yourself? Got a Matt Rose (Cubs) comp on him after signing, which amuses me because it wasn’t until I wrote it down right this very second that I realized the players had the same last name. They even each have four-letter first names. Could some subconscious association between the two young players be the root of that comparison? Maybe!

6.179 – LHP Mack Lemieux

LHP Mack Lemieux (Jupiter HS, Florida): 84-86 FB; 75-76 CU; 72-74 CB; good command; 6-3, 185 pounds

Those were my high school notes on Mack Lemieux from 2015. Baseball America (among others) have him peaking at 94 MPH after a season at Palm Beach State JC. Between that, his youth (just turned 20), his great pro debut (on the heels of a fine junior college season), significant athleticism, and a cool name, he’s one to watch closely.

7.209 – LHP Jordan Watson

Sometimes you don’t know what you’re missing in life until you’ve found it. I love this Jordan Watson guy. NAIA or not, striking out 176 batters in 104.2 innings is straight up awesome. And then to follow up that 15.14 K/9 with a 16.43 K/9 in his first 12.2 innings pitched as a pro? I’m firmly on the bandwagon.

Incidentally, Watson’s Science and Arts of Oklahoma baseball team also had a hitter named Yariel Gonzalez who did this as a senior: 457/.508/.796 with 24 BB/9 K and 12/14 SB. He latched on with the Cardinals as an undrafted free agent where he kept hitting as a pro. I like this guy, too. We’ll get to the Cardinals draft next Monday, so I won’t drone on and on and on about how well they identify quality amateur talent, but…man, they have a knack for this. Apologies to any Diamondbacks fan who feels slighted by St. Louis co-opting their draft review. You guys drafted well, too!

8.239 – C Ryan January

Recently got a text from a friend who saw Ryan January (366) for Missoula this summer that called him a “lefthanded Alex Jackson, but good.” I’m not necessarily throwing in the towel on the Mariners 20-year-old prep catcher to pro outfielder (and, for the record, neither was my friend), but that still made me laugh. Comparison to the currently stalled Jackson aside, the real takeaway here is that January can play. There are certainly some rough edges surrounding his bat and his overall approach as a hitter remains a work in progress, but there’s no doubting his bat speed, surprisingly deft feel for contact, and the special sound he’s capable of making on impact when he gets a hold of one.

The Alex Jackson mention was serendipitous (retroactively so since it’s been about two months since I got the text, but just go with it) as I’ve actually been thinking about him a lot as I type up these draft reviews. This is hardly groundbreaking stuff, but I’ll share it anyway. I champion future bench players and middle relievers on this site all the time. I think there’s tons of hidden value there, both on the field (duh) and on the margins of the payroll sheets (save money on those homegrown guys, spend savings on bigger stars). You can find these players all over the draft if you look hard enough. However, I don’t like when teams move a questionable defender off a tough defensive spot to an easier one when the player in question doesn’t have special upside with the bat. You’re more likely to get a good player that way, but far less likely to get a great player. That was my dilemma with Alex Jackson back when he was a draft prospect. As a catcher, sign me up. Even if the bat suffers some and he never becomes a great defensive player, it would have been worth it to me to see it through with him behind the plate. As an outfielder, conventional wisdom says that he can focus more clearly on his hitting and his overall offensive game will be the best that it can be. When the best that it can be is truly great, I get it. Bryce Harper is an all too obvious example of this. But a guy like Jackson was never Harper. A guy like Jackson was never all that likely (in my view) to ever be a top ten or so offensive player (at the position) as a corner outfielder. You’ve effectively downgraded the upside from a should-be major potential asset into just another interesting potential regular. You’ve gone from admittedly longer odds of maybe great to slightly better odds of maybe good. Jackson’s bat is good, but is it good enough to give up such a huge chunk of his potential defensive value to find out?

There are way more complicating factors than those stated above. Every player should be judged on his own specific strengths and weaknesses. And Alex Jackson the individual isn’t really the point here; I don’t know enough about him to say the M’s were wrong to move him or not, and I’m willing to defer judgment on their player development staff on that call. For me, moving him wasn’t the issue, but picking him where they did in the draft knowing that moving him was the likely plan was. I’m not saying never move a player from a position that you don’t think he can handle. That would obviously be ridiculous. Not everybody is a catcher or a center fielder or a shortstop. The previously mentioned Bryce Harper is just one of many times it does make sense to make such a switch. Maybe I’m just greedy. I don’t know. “Perfect is the enemy of the good,” they said. “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars,” they said. Who knows what to think these days…

All of this somehow brings us back to Ryan January. As a catcher, he’d instantly be on the short list of highest upside players at the position in all of baseball. If forced to shift to the outfield, his odds of reaching the big leagues would go up — yes, there would be more pressure on the bat, but I think that would be counterbalanced (and then some) by the easier day-to-day existence of a corner outfielder versus a catcher — but the odds of him being a difference-making overall player would go down. I really can’t say for sure if a full-time move to the outfield is worth it in January’s specific case, but it does appear that the Diamondbacks are committed to doing what they can to exhaust all possibilities to find out what it takes to keep him behind the plate for as long as possible. I’m thankful for that. January as a catcher could be a star.

9.269 – RHP Tommy Eveld

I don’t know why I didn’t rank Tommy Eveld in the top 500 of this draft class. Arizona clearly did and they were very smart to do so. So much time and energy on this site has been spent preaching about the advantages athleticism gives young pitching prospects. Somehow Eveld, arguably the most athletic pitcher in this entire class, fell through the cracks. This is what I had on him in March…

Tommy Eveld’s question marks fall more on me than him right now. He’s got a great frame, fantastic athleticism, and legitimate low-90s heat, but beyond that I don’t know a ton about him.

Time marched on and I never got around to filling in my Eveld knowledge gaps along the way. Extreme athleticism, a big-time arm (90-94) with plenty of bullets left in the chamber, a frame to dream on (6-5, 190), offspeed stuff that seemingly got better with every trip to the mound, and tons of missed bats (11.38 K/9 in 53.0 IP) along the way…I’m not really sure what more you could want. Fantastic pick by Arizona here. Eveld is worth getting excited about.

10.299 – OF Stephen Smith

What you see is what you get with Stephen Smith. There’s power, strength, and some athleticism. It’s a potential platoon bat in a corner if it really works and a 4A slugger if it doesn’t. If that worst case scenario comes to fruition, there’s always Japan.

11.329 – RHP Jake Polancic

Not too pleased that I whiffed so badly on Jake Polancic, a good looking Canadian arm up to 88-92 with his fastball with a promising curve to match. Few teams scout Canada as aggressively as Arizona and Tim Wilken’s arrival only upped the ante on getting as many eyes on prospects from the Great White North as possible.

12.359 – C Gavin Stupienski

Wrote this in March about Gavin Stupienski (194)…

Every June I kick myself for not writing more about unheralded players that I like more before the rest of the world catches on. There’s never enough time once the college season gets going and I always feel guilty about doing quick posts off the top of my head that would better suit the daily “hey, this guy is REALLY good” thoughts that have a habit of coming up about certain prospects. The premise of this post is goofy, but I’d like to think the content stands up enough to be taken seriously. That makes this the perfect platform to express again how much I like Gavin Stupienski. He’s hit during his summers, he hit as a redshirt-sophomore, he’s hitting so far this year…he can hit. There are no questions about his defense behind the plate and he’s a leader on one of the nation’s best mid-major teams. I’m not sure what more you could want. I’m all-in on Stupienski. Add him to the increasingly impressive top ten round catcher pile.

Getting a potential regular catcher (or high-level backup) with pick three hundred fifty-nine is a major win for the Diamondbacks. This really was a great year for college catching. Arizona got themselves a good one.

13.389 – 2B Manny Jefferson

I’m surprised more hasn’t been written about Manny Jefferson (255) on this site considering how much I like him. As a college hitter coming off a breakthrough draft season in spite of an ugly 25 BB/50 K ratio, Jefferson is not exactly my usual cup of tea. One line from my notes on him stands out: “best is yet to come as a hitter.” That’s always some cognitive dissonance when it comes to such claims. For high school players, sure why not. For college prospects carrying years of meaningful data, it’s tough to really buy into the persistent scout chatter about how close a guy is to flicking the switch. Too many smart people were in on Jefferson this spring, so I pushed him up the board here even with the scary BB/K ratio. We’ll see how it all turns out. The difference between real improvement there (long-time big league regular), moderate improvement (see below), and little improvement (AA washout) will make or break his career.

With that moderate improvement in approach, I could see Jefferson settling nicely into a bat-first (power-first, really) utility player role capable of holding his own at literally any spot on the diamond save catcher and probably center. I have a player in mind I really want to comp him too, but for some reason the name keeps escaping me. In lieu of that perfect comp, I’ll throw out a pretty good one instead. I’m thinking Jefferson’s upside is something not unlike former Brewer do-everything Bill Hall.

14.419 – LHP Colin Poche

Old comps die hard, so when Perfect Game busted out an Andy Pettitte comp for Colin Poche (410) many years ago it really stuck with me. Poche is very clearly not Pettitte — few are — but he’s still a solid prospect and a great get here in the fourteenth round. What works for Poche is really good command of a slew of decent to slightly better pitches he can throw in any count or game situation. His low-90s fastball hasn’t yet returned from the Tommy John surgery that knocked him out of the 2015 college season, but he can still be effective living in the upper-80s and occasionally touching 90. Deception, extension, and athleticism are all pretty big points in his favor as well. He’s a prospect teetering on that fifth starter/middle relief line with a chance for a little more if some of his pre-injury stuff ever comes back.

15.449 – RHP Tyler Keele

Tyler Keele is the first of three straight college relievers taken by Arizona known best by their propensity for sinking fastballs and generating ground balls. I have Keele’s breaking ball as more of an in-between slider/curve, but it serves a similar purpose as the slider thrown by both Nick Blackburn and Jake Winston. Keele has a chance to be the best of the trio thanks in part to a usable split-change. The limited batted ball pro data on the three is interesting. Keele did not get many ground ball outs in his debut. Blackburn didn’t pitch enough for it to matter. And Winston got a ton of ground ball outs. Small sample size caveats apply, but so far advantage Winston.

16.479 – RHP Nick Blackburn

These are written out of order, so the Jake Winston thing you’ll read below was actually finished before whatever it is I’m about to write about Nick Blackburn. You can skip to that to get some of my feelings on Blackburn, but the short version is this: sinker/slider college reliever with a chance to be a sinker/slider big league reliever with continued work.

17.509 – RHP Jake Winston

“Better stuff than he’s shown” was a common refrain from those who have seen Jake Winston do his thing over the years for Southern Mississippi. The sinker/slider reliever has solid stuff across the board (87-92, 94 peak with the sinker; above-average slider; good command of both pitches), but lacks that singular put-away pitch to make him much more than a potential mid-relief ground ball guy. There’s nothing wrong with that in the seventeenth round, of course. Winston leaves us wanting more, and that’s something that probably says more about us than it does him.

19.569 – SS Mark Karaviotis

It’s really easy to say you love a pick after said pick goes out and hits a combined .347/.491/.485 in 217 across two levels in his pro debut. Still, I really do love this pick. Mark Karaviotis is a really good prospect who suffered from “out of sight, out of mind” syndrome in his draft year at Oregon. You would think more teams would have been on a true shortstop who kicked off his college career with two seasons of fine on-base showings (.369 OBP in 2014, .407 OBP in 2015), but injuries kept him off the field enough in 2016 that he slipped through the cracks more than his talent should have allowed. He’s not a tools monster in any way — good arm, solid range, average speed, decent pop — but he’s shown a knack for getting on base, coming up with big hits when needed, and playing mistake-free ball. He won’t keep hitting as he did in his debut, but he could very well hit enough to wind up a big league utility guy with the chance to earn some run as a starter depending on his timing. Kudos to Arizona for staying with him and being willing to give him $100,000 to sign. The young college junior (20-years-old all season) had plenty of leverage if he wanted to go back to school.

20.599 – RHP Connor Grey

No reports here on Connor Grey’s stuff while at St. Bonaventure, but he did get a mention on the site for his standout senior year performance: 9.29 K/9 – 3.23 BB/9 – 92.0 IP – 2.84 ERA. He added an even 60.0 innings on quality pitching as a pro on top of that. That kind of workhorse behavior is doubly impressive when you consider Grey’s a compactly built 6-0, 180 pound guy who gets by more on guile than big raw stuff.

22.659 – RHP Kevin Ginkel

Kevin Ginkel has impressive size (6-5, 215) and a slider with serious upside. His pro start was better than his draft year at Arizona. Funny how that works sometimes. I didn’t have any reports on his velocity as an amateur, but apparently he was up to the mid- to upper-90s in his pro debut. Putting that and his slider together adds up to one serious late-round relief steal.

23.689 – C Luke Van Rycheghem

I know very little of Luke Van Rycheghem. The Canadian does have a name very well-suited for hockey. I could see it really working as a defenseman. Maybe I’m thinking of Luke Richardson (who, incidentally, I hadn’t thought of in at least a decade before now) combined with James van Reimsdyk. Anyway, Van Rycheghem is a big (6-3, 210) and strong former catcher now being asked to worry first and foremost about hitting it long and far as a first baseman.

24.719 – RHP Riley Smith

On Riley Smith from January 2016…

JR RHP Riley Smith is the biggest wild card on the staff. His raw ability suggests he could be the highest drafted arm off of this staff in 2016, but there’s always some risk in projecting a college arm who hasn’t done it at this level that high. I’ve always preferred talent to experience, so count me very much in on Smith heading into his draft year.

The former LSU Tiger remains a big old wild card to me. His draft season was an unmitigated disaster (4.59 K/9 and 5.05 BB/9 in 19.2 IP), but the arm talent (89-93 FB, 95 peak; pair of interesting low-80s offspeed pitches) was obviously enough for Arizona to look past his struggles. So far, so good for Smith in the pros: 8.35 K/9 and 1.11 BB/9 in 32.1 IP (2.51 ERA).

25.749 – OF Myles Babitt

I love the MLB Draft. Where else do you see a player drafted from Cal State East Bay by way of the Academy of Art? Myles Babitt is a fascinating guy who has put up tons of weird, fun numbers over the years. His draft season saw him hit .308/.410/.400 with 22 BB and 5 K. That’s an insane BB/K ratio. He followed it up by hitting .300/.406/.322 with 16 BB/14 K in his pro debut. I don’t know what’s crazier there: is it the still great BB/K ratio or the comically small ISO? There’s no way that Babitt’s golden approach and whatever the opposite of golden (rusty? dull? Yahoo Answers says purple is the opposite color to gold, so maybe that?) power output can continue to coexist in pro ball, right? Or are we looking at the Willians Astudillo of the outfield? Either way, I’m excited to find out. Worth pointing out that Myles is the son of Shooty Babitt, a former Arizona and current New York Mets scout.

26.779 – 1B Tanner Hill

A friend of mine really likes Tanner Hill. He called him the next Tyler White. I don’t personally see it, but there you go.

27.809 – RHP Gabe Gonzalez

Gabe Gonzalez checks a lot of boxes: size (6-5, 220), fastball (90-94 FB, 95-96 peak), breaking ball (above-average yet inconsistent SL), and a track record of missing bats (8.11 K/9 in 2015, 10.41 K/9 in 2016). He’s still searching for a consistent slower third pitch to use — he’s used both a splitter and a forkball as a means of changing up speeds in the past — and his control remains spotty at best (4.77 BB/9 in 2015, 5.89 BB/9 in 2016), but there’s a lot to work with.

31.929 – RHP Williams Durruthy

Williams Durruthy has top ten round arm talent and undrafted free agent levels of control. The Diamondbacks split the difference with his thirty-first round selection. At his best, Durruthy is spotting a low-90s heater and a legitimate plus cutter. At his worst, he’s walking every hitter in sight. A phrase I heard more than once about Durruthy this spring: “too much movement for his own good.” If Arizona’s pro coaching can help him harness his stuff, he’s got real late-inning reliever upside. That’s a hefty “if,” admittedly, but betting on talent that can’t be taught in the latter stages of the draft is just good sense.

32.959 – RHP Trevor Simms

The highly athletic and well-traveled Trevor Simms has a good (90-95 MPH) yet wild right arm that should get him his share of chances over the next few seasons. He’ll need to act fast, however, as he’ll enter his first full year as a 25-year-old in A-ball.

33.989 – SS Paxton De La Garza

A very impressive debut for Paxton De La Garza has put the righthanded middle infielder from Angelo State on the deep sleeper map. His numbers as a Ram were good, so you can see what Arizona must have seen in him. I approve.

34.1019 – OF Connor Owings

Wow. A highly productive player from the national champions who can play multiple positions and run a little bit falling to the thirty-fourth round? Nice grab by Arizona here taking Connor Owings (392) this late. There’s a chance they only pulled the trigger because of the family ties at play — brother Chris is a 2B/SS/OF for the big club — but whatever the reason for taking Owens was, the fact remains he’s now part of the Diamondbacks organization and that’s a good thing for them.

35.1049 – OF Billy Endris

On Billy Endris from March 2016…

Further down the list is another Florida Atlantic product, Billy Endris. Endris is a good college player who has built a decent case over the last year plus that he’s got enough to warrant a late look in the draft.

His senior year was lackluster enough that I’m surprised that prediction came true. Still cool for him to be drafted. They can never take that away from him.

36.1079 – LHP Rob Galligan

Maybe a matchup lefty. Have him as a mid-80s guy with a nice curve and good size in my notes. Senior year numbers were wild (6.57 BB/9), but not really indicative of his decent overall control.

Unsigned Prospects and Where You Can Find Them in 2017

Jordan Wiley (San Jacinto), Nelson Mompierre (Missouri), Welby Malczewski (Auburn), Brandon Martorano (North Carolina), Hunter Kiel (LSU), Edmond Americaan (Chipola JC), Cameron Cannon (Arizona), Bowden Francis (Chipola JC), Jacob Olson (West Georgia Tech)

2016 MLB Draft Follow Lists – Colonial Athletic Conference

I’ll update this to provide more commentary when I can, but for now I’m pleased to say how much I like the CAA this year. There’s no doubt in my mind that the conference will blow by last year’s twelve drafted players in this year’s draft.

Bradley Jones has one of the top power/speed blends in all the country, Charley Gould was seemingly put on this planet to hit baseballs, and Gavin Stupienski checks all the boxes one could hope to see in a potential big league backstop. Chad Carroll, Casey Golden, and Morgan Phillips have all had good college careers, but still have enough untapped physical talent that each could be considered an upside play and potential mid-spring surger up draft boards.

The pitching is really impressive at the top. Aaron Civale and Bailey Ober look like strong candidates to pitch in professional rotations for a long time; I can see mid-rotation ceilings for both. Then there’s a slew of hard-throwing relievers who should make their mark on the draft this June: Jared Gesell, Chris Hall, Joe McGillicuddy, and Joseph Gaouette can all reach the mid-90s with an above-average (give or take) offspeed pitch to go with the heat.

Hitters

  1. College of Charleston JR OF/SS Bradley Jones
  2. William & Mary SR 1B/C Charley Gould
  3. UNC Wilmington rJR C Gavin Stupienski
  4. Towson JR C/3B Brady Policelli
  5. James Madison rSR OF/2B Chad Carroll
  6. Elon JR 3B/OF Nick Zammarelli
  7. Towson rJR OF/1B Chris Henze
  8. Hofstra JR SS/2B Brad Witkowski
  9. UNC Wilmington JR OF/RHP Casey Golden
  10. College of Charleston rSR OF Morgan Phillips
  11. UNC Wilmington SR OF/3B Steven Linkous
  12. UNC Wilmington SR 3B/SS Terence Connelly
  13. Delaware rSO 3B Diaz Nardo
  14. Elon rJR OF Will Nance
  15. College of Charleston JR C Ervin Roper
  16. UNC Wilmington rJR SS Kennard McDowell
  17. Elon JR OF Kyle Jackson
  18. Elon JR OF Jamal Clarke
  19. William & Mary rSR OF/C Josh Smith
  20. James Madison rJR 1B/3B Brett Johnson
  21. UNC Wilmington SR OF Joe Bertone
  22. James Madison JR OF Ky Parrott
  23. James Madison SR C Bobby San Martin
  24. Towson rJR OF AJ Gallo
  25. Northeastern JR 3B Cam Hanley
  26. Northeastern JR OF Pat Madigan
  27. College of Charleston SR OF Alex Pastorius
  28. James Madison JR 1B/LHP Logan Corrigan

Pitchers

  1. Northeastern JR RHP Aaron Civale
  2. College of Charleston rSO RHP Bailey Ober
  3. Northeastern JR RHP Dustin Hunt
  4. UNC Wilmington SR RHP Jared Gesell
  5. Elon JR RHP/C Chris Hall
  6. Elon rSR RHP Joe McGillicuddy
  7. William & Mary SR RHP Joseph Gaouette
  8. Hofstra SR RHP Alex Eisenberg
  9. James Madison JR LHP Michael Evans
  10. College of Charleston SR RHP Nathan Helvey
  11. College of Charleston rSO RHP Hayden McCutcheon
  12. Elon JR RHP Matt Harris
  13. Elon JR RHP Nick Beaulac
  14. William & Mary JR RHP Nick Brown
  15. Delaware rSO RHP Ron Marinaccio
  16. College of Charleston rSO RHP Michael Carpin
  17. UNC Wilmington SR RHP Ryan Foster
  18. William & Mary SR RHP Mitchell Aker
  19. Elon rSR RHP/C Michael Elefante
  20. Elon JR LHP Jordan Barrett
  21. Towson rJR RHP Kevin Ross
  22. UNC Wilmington SR LHP Taylor Hyssong
  23. College of Charleston SR LHP Eric Bauer
  24. Elon SR LHP Tyler Manez
  25. Elon rJR LHP Brandon Kacer
  26. Hofstra rSR LHP Brendan Mulligan
  27. Northeastern rJR RHP Mike Fitzgerald
  28. Towson SR RHP Lee Lawler

College of Charleston

rSO RHP Hayden McCutcheon (2016)
rSO RHP Bailey Ober (2016)
SR RHP Nathan Helvey (2016)
SR LHP Eric Bauer (2016)
rSO RHP Michael Carpin (2016)
JR OF/SS Bradley Jones (2016)
rJR C/1B Jake Maziar (2016)
rSR OF Morgan Phillips (2016)
SR OF Alex Pastorius (2016)
JR C Ervin Roper (2016)
SO RHP Justin Baker (2017)
SO RHP Carter Love (2017)
rFR 1B Logan McRae (2017)
SO OF Ryan Brown (2017)
SO INF Tommy Richter (2017)
FR RHP Clay Helvey (2018)
FR LHP Evan Sisk (2018)
FR SS Dupree Hart (2018)
FR SS Luke Manzo (2018)

High Priority Follows: Hayden McCutcheon, Bailey Ober, Nathan Helvey, Michael Carpin, Bradley Jones, Jake Maziar, Morgan Phillips, Ervin Roper

Delaware

JR LHP Kevin Milley (2016)
rSO RHP Ron Marinaccio (2016)
JR 3B/SS James Meeker (2016)
SR 1B Nick Liggett (2016)
JR INF Doug Trimble (2016)
JR 2B Nick Tierno (2016)
rSO 3B Diaz Nardo (2016)
rJR OF Jordan Glover (2016)
SO RHP Scott Zimmer (2017)
SO RHP Nick Spadafino (2017)
SO OF Calvin Scott (2017)
rFR OF/C Kevin Mohollen (2017)
FR LHP Brandon Walter (2018)

High Priority Follows: Ron Marinaccio, Nick Liggett, Diaz Nardo

Elon

JR LHP Jordan Barrett (2016)
rSR RHP Joe McGillicuddy (2016)
SR LHP Tyler Manez (2016)
rJR LHP Brandon Kacer (2016)
JR RHP Matt Harris (2016)
JR RHP Nick Beaulac (2016)
JR RHP/C Chris Hall (2016)
rSR RHP/C Michael Elefante (2016)
rJR OF Will Nance (2016)
SR C Danny Lynch (2016)
JR 3B/OF Nick Zammarelli (2016)
JR OF Kyle Jackson (2016)
JR OF Jamal Clarke (2016)
SR C Austin Leeney (2016)
rJR 2B/SS Kory Shumate (2016)
SO RHP Sean Byrnes (2017)
SO RHP Robbie Welhaf (2017)
SO C/1B James Venuto (2017)
FR RHP Mason Daniels (2018)
FR SS Cam Devanney (2018)
FR 2B Ryne Ogren (2018)

High Priority Follows: Jordan Barrett, Joe McGillicuddy, Matt Harris, Nick Beaulac, Chris Hall, Michael Elefante, Will Nance, Nick Zammarelli, Kyle Jackson, Jamal Clarke

Hofstra

SR RHP Alex Eisenberg (2016)
SR RHP Chris Bonk (2016)
rSR LHP Brendan Mulligan (2016)
SR RHP Bowie Matteson (2016)
rSO RHP Matt Weissheier (2016)
rJR C Chris Hardardt (2016)
rSR 1B/OF Ryan Karl (2016)
JR SS/2B Brad Witkowski (2016)
SO RHP Adam Heidenfelder (2017)
SO RHP Chris Weiss (2017)
SO OF/LHP Teddy Cillis (2017)
SO OF Matt Annunziata (2017)
SO OF Steven Foster (2017)
rFR C/1B Nick Bottari (2017)
FR C Vito Friscia (2018)

High Priority Follows: Alex Eisenberg, Brad Witkowski

James Madison

SR RHP Mark Gunst (2016)
rSR LHP Aaron Hoover (2016)
rJR RHP Brandon Withers (2016)
JR LHP Michael Evans (2016)
JR 1B/LHP Logan Corrigan (2016)
rSR OF/2B Chad Carroll (2016)
SR C Bobby San Martin (2016)
rSR SS Kyle Weston (2016)
rJR 1B/3B Brett Johnson (2016)
SR OF Tyler Carroll (2016)
JR OF Josh Wyatt (2016)
JR OF Ky Parrott (2016)
SO LHP Eric Yankey (2017)
SO OF Michael Sciorra (2017)
SO 2B Kyle McPherson (2017)
SO 3B Bradley McKay (2017)

High Priority Follows: Michael Evans, Chad Carroll, Bobby San Martin, Brett Johnson, Ky Parrott

Northeastern

JR RHP Aaron Civale (2016)
JR RHP Dustin Hunt (2016)
rJR RHP Mike Fitzgerald (2016)
SR LHP James Mulry (2016)
SR RHP Nick Cubarney (2016)
rSO 1B/LHP Zach Perry (2016)
JR 3B Cam Hanley (2016)
JR OF Pat Madigan (2016)
rSR C Josh Trieff (2016)
SO RHP Brian Christian (2017)
SO INF/OF Mason Koppens (2017)
SO 3B Maxwell Burt (2017)
SO INF Nolan Lang (2017)
FR LHP Andrew Misiaszek (2018)
FR OF Jake Farrell (2018)
FR 2B Charlie McConnell (2018)
FR INF Ryan Solomon (2018)

High Priority Follows: Aaron Civale, Dustin Hunt, Mike Fitzgerald, Cam Hanley, Pat Madigan

Towson

SR RHP Lee Lawler (2016)
rJR RHP Kevin Ross (2016)
SR RHP Garrett Walther (2016)
rJR LHP Matt Golczewski (2016)
SR RHP Austin Clark (2016)
rSR RHP Paul Beers (2016)
rSR 1B Spencer Sutton (2016)
rJR OF/1B Chris Henze (2016)
rJR OF AJ Gallo (2016)
rJR 2B/SS Colin Dyer (2016)
JR C/3B Brady Policelli (2016)
rSO 1B Colin Gimblet (2016)
SO LHP David Marriggi (2017)
SO RHP Alex Cuas (2017)
SO OF Mark Grunberg (2017)
SO C Tristan Howerton (2017)
FR SS Richard Palacios (2018)

High Priority Follows: Lee Lawler, Kevin Ross, Chris Henze, AJ Gallo, Brady Policelli

UNC Wilmington

SR RHP Jared Gesell (2016)
SR RHP Ryan Foster (2016)
SR LHP Taylor Hyssong (2016)
rSO LHP Whitman Barnes (2016)
rSO LHP Clay Lockamon (2016)
JR OF/RHP Casey Golden (2016)
SR 3B/SS Terence Connelly (2016)
SR OF/3B Steven Linkous (2016)
SR 1B/OF Andy Austin (2016)
rJR SS Kennard McDowell (2016)
rJR C Gavin Stupienski (2016)
SR OF Joe Bertone (2016)
JR OF/2B Robbie Thorburn (2016)
SO RHP Zack Burke (2017)
SO RHP Justin Crump (2017)
SO RHP Josh Roberson (2017)
SO RHP Austin Magestro (2017)
SO RHP Austin Easter (2017)
SO 2B Brian Mims (2017)
SO INF Zack Canada (2017)
SO C Nick Freight (2017)
FR C Ryan Jeffers (2018)
FR 1B Walker Imwalle (2018)
FR RHP Alex Royalty (2018)
FR INF Blake Deatherage (2018)
FR RHP/OF Clark Cota (2018)

High Priority Follows: Jared Gesell, Ryan Foster, Taylor Hyssong, Whitman Barnes, Clay Lockamon, Casey Golden, Terence Connelly, Steven Linkous, Keenard McDowell, Gavin Stupienski, Joe Bertone

William & Mary

SR RHP Joseph Gaouette (2016)
SR LHP Andrew White (2016)
SR RHP Mitchell Aker (2016)
JR RHP Nick Brown (2016)
JR RHP Daniel Powers (2016)
JR RHP John Yoest (2016)
JR OF/RHP Charles Ameer (2016)
SR 1B/C Charley Gould (2016)
rSR OF/C Josh Smith (2016)
JR 3B/SS Tim Hoehn (2016)
JR INF Ryder Miconi (2016)
JR OF Matthew Tilley (2016)
SO RHP Rob White (2017)
SO RHP Michael Toner (2017)
rFR SS Kyle Wrighte (2017)
SO OF Ryan Hall (2017)
SO 2B Cullen Large (2017)
FR RHP/1B Nick Butts (2018)

High Priority Follows: Joseph Gaouette, Mitchell Aker, Nick Brown, Charles Ameer, Charley Gould, Josh Smith