The Baseball Draft Report

Home » Posts tagged 'Austin Rei'

Tag Archives: Austin Rei

Advertisements

2015 MLB Draft Reviews – Boston Red Sox

Boston Red Sox 2015 MLB Draft Picks 

13 – Andrew Benintendi
93 – Logan Allen
95 – Austin Rei
122 – Marcus Brakeman
135 – Tate Matheny
241 – Tucker Tubbs
259 – Mitchell Gunsolus
265 – Kyri Washington
268 – Kevin Kelleher
353 – Travis Lakins
368 – Yomar Valentin
399 – Nicholos Hamilton

I’m not sure what to say about OF Andrew Benintendi (13) that hasn’t already been said. His sophomore season was insane. His pro debut was phenomenal. Literally everybody who has seen him play at Arkansas, Lowell, and Greenville in the last calendar year has walked away raving about him. I like the lefthanded AJ Pollock comp I threw on him before the draft as it pertains to his all-around game. Additionally, the fact that as a native Philadelphian I threw out a Chase Utley swing/body comp is serious business. I had somebody recently tell me that they think Benintendi is the best college bat since Anthony Rendon, a player (minus handedness) that he felt Benintendi could approximate in terms of total value as a hitter. So, if you’re scoring at home, that’s Pollock, Utley, and Rendon as possible comps with names like Mark Kotsay, Eric Byrnes, and David Dellucci (Baseball America) also mentioned as starting points. Not bad. Here’s a quick note from during the season just days before Benintendi’s stock began to soar in the public’s eye…

I never went back and mentioned Andrew Benintendi as being draft-eligible in 2015, but he is. That’s good news for me because Benintendi is awesome and getting him one step closer to pro ball makes me happy. He’s more ballplayer than tools freak, so teams that value big amateur production will have him higher than others. That said, he’s plenty talented: above-average or better hit tool, above-average or better speed, solid pop, enough range for center, and a disciplined approach at the plate. He’s really damn good. Baseball America has compared him to Austin Cousino in the past, but Benintendi’s huge sophomore season (.370/.475/.733 with 30 BB/24 K in 146 AB as of this edit) should vault him past Cousino’s 2014 draft spot (80th overall). I’ve heard from some that think I’m too rich on Benintendi’s tools and that’s fine, but I’m buying him as a prospect all the way.

Interestingly enough, I was able to dig up some older stuff on Benintendi in the archives. This was his quick HS scouting bio…

OF Andrew Benintendi (Madeira HS, Ohio): good speed; CF range; average arm; really smart player; above-average hit tool; FAVORITE; 5-10, 180 pounds

Hey, he was a FAVORITE back then! Always good to see.

I’m not a big fantasy guy — mostly out of the seemingly contradictory combination of general laziness and the fear of letting my over-competitive self getting sucked in too deep — but the one league I’ve been in forever allows the twelve owners to roster three minor league players at any given time. Having only thirty-six minor league prospects floating around the league at a time doesn’t exactly incite the most compelling post-draft scramble for new professional talent each June, but it always surprises me to see how long recent draftees sit around waiting for more casual minor league fans to buy in. Since I’m all about “drafting” my own hitters and figuring out pitching on the fly, I’d put Benintendi at or near the top of the 2015 MLB Draft in terms of fantasy value. Boston’s crowded outfield picture complicates things a bit and strong arguments could be made for others (Alex Bregman for sure, maybe Trenton Clark if you want to get crazy), but Benintendi could be on the Michael Conforto path to the big leagues. He’s really good at hitting baseballs. Pick him up in fantasy if you can.

The pre-draft stuff on C Austin Rei (95)…

I still think Rei gets picked way higher than anybody thinks because he’s coming into pro ball at the perfect time with plus pitch framing skills that match what teams want to see most in catching prospects. I’m a really big fan of Rei and think he’s one of the draft’s “safest” prospects with both a high ceiling (above-average regular) and high floor (elite defensive backup). Barring additional injuries, I don’t see how he doesn’t have some sort of big league career.

His defense is enough to keep him employed for a very long time and the flashes of above-average power could give him a chance to play regularly. I was hoping to see his approach take a step forward in 2015, but the torn thumb ligament made judging his actual progress at the plate this spring tricky. His free-swinging ways would still keep me from ranking among the minors best catching prospects, but there’s enough here to see him as a major league mainstay even if he doesn’t reach what some (like me) once considered his above-average regular ceiling.

Of all the players in this class, I might have been most surprised at the early pro struggles of OF Tate Matheny (135). Matheny, valued far more for his his patient approach as a hitter and well-rounded overall game than his raw tools, wasn’t able to do much offensively (9 BB/52 K) in his debut season. It’s only 213 PA, but the lack of raw power (body and swing) could prevent him from reaching an offensive ceiling heavily dependent on on-base skills. I was more willing to overlook the average at best power upside as a college player when he was racking up those .400+ OBPs, but time will tell if he’ll figure out away to adjust to how pro pitchers attack hitters like him at the higher levels.

The rise of many of this class’s toolsier players finally putting it together, especially among the outfield group, has taken some of the shine off of the more solid than spectacular types like Missouri State JR OF Tate Matheny. Matheny still looks like a good bet to fulfill his destiny as a fourth outfielder who won’t kill you in a starting role at times (especially if deployed properly), but teams in the market for upside plays will likely look elsewhere. Such is the life of a guy with no tool worse than average, but no carrying tool either.

OF Jagger Rusconi was called out as an outfielder on draft day, but was primarily a second baseman in high school and in his pro debut. His best offensive skill right now is his legs as the plus runner can wreak havoc on the base paths when given the opportunity. The rest of his offensive game is intriguing — feel for hit, sneaky pop, all kinds of athleticism — though understandably raw. I was set to call this an overdraft (if such things existed) to a degree, but I could see an alternate reality where Rusconi would have turned into a slam dunk top three round pick — maybe like an Andrew Stevenson? — if he had enrolled at USC instead of signing. A friend in Boston who knows me all too well told me that the hope within the Red Sox scouting staff is that Rusconi can be their version of Roman Quinn. Consider my interest piqued.

This was written here about 1B Tucker Tubbs (241) last December…

If SR 1B/3B Tucker Tubbs can rediscover his lost power stroke, he’s got a chance to get popped as a potential four-corners minor league bench bat.

Fast-forward six months and we see that Tubbs did exactly that. The Memphis slugger and the aforementioned Benintendi were two of the eight players that hit the 600 SLG and BB > K benchmarks at the D1 level back when I checked at the end of May. Tubbs wound up just short by the end of the season (.305/.393/.601 with 26 BB/27 K), but that’s still a heck of a senior season. Or, in other words: “He has power and doesn’t strike out much,” said Rikard. “That’s a pretty good formula for some level of success.” Straight from the Red Sox amateur scouting director’s mouth! Lefthanded hitting 3B Mitch Gunsolus (259) could form the other half of a fun platoon with Tubbs one day. While Tubbs missed out on the 600 SLG and BB> K Club by just one walk (or strikeout if you look at it that way), Gunsolus was just a few extra base hits off the mark (.556 SLG with 33 BB/32 K). I love watching Gunsolus hit and it wouldn’t surprise me at all if the tenth rounder did enough at the plate to advance all the way up to the big leagues.

Even though the Red Sox went heavy on hitting with their top ten round picks, they found a way to really make it count with the three pitchers they selected in rounds six, seven, and eight. Getting LHP Logan Allen (93) in the eighth round is just silly value. Fast-rising high school arms who see a big uptick in stuff in a short amount of time typically scare me off, but Allen’s plus pitchability, really strong command (I’d go plus), and willingness to throw any of his four potentially average or better pitches (88-92 FB, 94 peak; mid-70s CB that flashes average or better; upper-70s cut-change thing that works; hard slider that might wind up the best of them all) in any count make him a fascinating potential big league starter who really had no business falling out of the top three rounds. RHP Travis Lakins (353) is an athletic young arm with less miles on it as a draft-eligible sophomore than many of his peers. I view him as a really good potential reliever, but I can see why one would look at his athleticism, frame with some projection left, and fastball command and think otherwise. RHP Ben Taylor lives 88-92 and can get it up to 93-94 with nice deception in his windup. Everything — the heater, his breaking ball, even a rarely used changeup — plays up in short bursts. His gigantic senior season (14.23 K/9 and 1.47 ERA in 42 IP) positioned him very nicely for a spot in the top ten rounds and the Red Sox wisely were the ones to give him a shot. Look out for him pitching the sixth innings at Fenway sooner rather than later.

I don’t know quite what it is about RHP Marc Brakeman (122), but something intuitively gives me pause when it comes to his long-term future. He’s got the stuff (88-93 FB, 95 peak; plus to plus-plus sinking low-80s CU; average or better mid- to upper-70s CB) and pedigree to start, but I always walk away from seeing him thinking the sum of the whole doesn’t quite add up. It’s especially hypocritical for me to not like him all that much because his best pitch — seriously, his changeup is as good as any in this class — just so happens to be my offspeed offering of choice. I touched briefly on the intuition thing before the season…

Stanford JR RHP Marc Brakeman is more of a two-pitch prospect (like Twomey) that I’ve referenced above. Armed with a nice albeit inconsistent heater (88-94, 95 peak – though I’ve seen him sit more on the low end of that range at times) and an outstanding low-80s changeup, Brakeman could move up boards quickly once he gets healthy again. I’ve been the low man on him in the past, but that’s more due to an intuition thing than anything I can reasonably express.

A part of me sees his stuff playing up in a big way out of the bullpen; that’s his most likely direct path to the big leagues. In that role, I don’t think it’s crazy to suggest he’s got legitimate late-inning upside on the continuum of Francisco Rodriguez, Tyler Clippard, or Kelvin Herrera, depending on how the fastball works in short bursts. If that’s the outcome, that’s a gigantic victory considering Brakeman’s 16th round standing (overslot bonus or not).

RHP Kevin Kelleher (268) had a slightly auspicious pro debut: 0.1 IP 0 H 4 ER 7 BB 0 K. Ouch. Now you, Mr./Mrs. Negative, could choose to focus on those four earned runs and seven walks, but I, uplifting soul that I am, think Kelleher should be lauded for getting an out. I mean, that’s one more than 99.9999% of the human population ever got, right? It’s also impressive that he’s literally never given up a pro hit yet. We’re all about the silver linings here.

I kid about Kelleher because I really do like him as a prospect. Wrote this about him before the year…

With a dominant FB/SL combination New Orleans JR RHP Kevin Kelleher has big league closer upside. That’s a bolder prediction that I intended to make, but the stuff seems in line with what we’ve come to expect out of late-inning relievers. Players who can get it up to 98 with a hard mid- to upper-80s slider to match aren’t easy to find.

Upside might be a bit rich there, but I don’t think it’s totally crazy. Even without working out the kinks needed to reach his considerable ceiling, I think he’s a big leaguer and surprisingly quick mover. Great pick in the twelfth round.

I almost always kick of my college draft coverage by writing about the ACC because I’m a creature of habit and the ACC is the first conference listed in my running draft Word document. As such, I tend to have more in the archives about ACC players. LHP Brad Stone (NC State) and RHP Trevor Kelley (North Carolina) both were “lucky” enough to get fairly extensive ramblings from me last spring. Here’s Stone…

JR LHP Brad Stone seems poised to take over the mantle as top pitching prospect, but, no knock against him, his stuff (upper-80s heat, usable change, pair of interesting breaking balls) is many steps down from Rodon on his worst day. He’s still the best of what’s around, and an arm worthy of serious draft consideration going forward.

And here’s Kelley…

On the opposite side of the spectrum there’s a guy who is so much what is great about the sport. SR RHP Trevor “Everyday” Kelley has more than lived up to his name this year. Kelley has appeared in 28 out of 39 games (72%) this year. That would come out to around 115 appearances in a 162 game season. To further put that into context, Kelley has more innings pitched right now than all but two Tar Heels pitchers. Guys with six (Hunter Williams) and seven (Moss) starts have significantly less innings than Kelley. One of the secrets of adulthood that I feel qualified to share with younger readers now that I’m a wizened old man less than seven months away from turning thirty is that just showing up is a huge part of getting by in this world. Trevor Kelley clearly has that covered. Some people prefer to do more than just get by, so it should be noted that it turns out you can get ahead by actually making a positive difference (or, you know, at least an effort) after you’ve shown up. I’d say pitching almost two innings per appearance (note: it’s closer to 1.2 innings per outing, but we can round up) with an ERA of 2.36 while striking out close to 7.5 batters per nine is a pretty strong impression to leave after each showing. Kelley’s stuff is more solid than spectacular (86-91 FB with sink, CB flashes plus) and he’s never truly dominated in a relief role, but I’d like to think there’s some draft value to be squeezed out of a reliable rubber-armed reliever who attacks hitters at a funky angle.

Kelley had an excellent senior season (8.19 K/9 and 2.31 BB/9 in 77 [!] relief innings) before doing more of the same upon joining the Red Sox organization. I’m frankly stunned that a player like him could fall to the 36th round. The Rob Wooten comp is easy and maybe even a bit lazy, but it fits. If anything, I think he could wind up having a better pro career thanks to a separating pitch (CB), rubber arm, and funky arm action. It’s a nice middle relief profile. Stone did not have an excellent senior season (7.80 K/9 and 10.80 BB/9 in 15 IP). That’s no reason to write him off as a viable prospect, of course. He changes speeds well and has always missed his fair share of bats. If the control gets in check and he continues to fill out, there could be something there.

On the opposite end of the physical spectrum, LHP Matt Kent, LHP Bobby Poyner, and LHP Logan Boyd are all undersized lefthanders with enough stuff to keep things interesting as they progress through the minors. Kent is a nice organizational arm, Poyner is a little bit better than that, and Boyd falls somewhere in between. I know little about RHP Danny Zandona except for the fact he put up eye-popping numbers (14.18 K/9 in 39 IP) in his senior year at Cal Poly. I’m similarly bereft of information on RHP Adam Lau, a two-way player at UAB who walked the effectively wild tightrope (11.81 K/9 and 5.06 BB/9 added up to a 1.69 ERA in 31 IP) in his junior season. RHP Nick Duron is the third player ever drafted out of Clark College and the first since Randy Myers (!) in 1982. RHP Max Watt, Trent Steele’s oldest and dearest friend, is another pitcher I don’t know much about. Wouldn’t bet against a name like that, though.

Much was written about OF Kyri Washington (265) on this site this past calendar year. Here’s one such excerpt…

JR OF Kyri Washington has as much a claim to the top position player spot in his conference as just about any prospect in the country. Evaluating amateur talent is sometimes only as hard as we make it. Your eyes eventually settle into seeing predictable patterns in the players you see and you find yourself getting unusually adept at recognizing the kind of ability that will become universally lauded as pro-caliber. “Always bet on ______” is more than just a snappy one-off line, but a mantra that serves those who watch a disproportionate amount of baseball well as they assess a prospect’s future. In Washington’s case, his athleticism and raw power qualify as abilities that stack up against almost any current big league player. If those are the traits that you value highly – and, really, who doesn’t? – then Washington is just about as good as it gets in college ball this year.

Conversely, anybody who watches a ton of amateur ball can quickly realize the holes in a mega-talented player’s game. If you’re an “always bet on the hit tool, including the consistent ability to make contact, the capacity to make adjustments within an at bat (or at least a game), and a seemingly innate overall feel for the strike zone and resourcefulness to spit on sometimes-strikes that he can’t do anything with,” well, then you might have some trepidation in championing a player who otherwise has first round tools. I’m on the fence as to whether or not how much of what we consider to fall under the plate discipline/approach to hitting umbrella can be taught, but I do believe that Washington is at the age in his baseball development when figuring it out – maybe not completely, but certainly to a degree – is well within the realm of possibility. That possibility on top of the prodigious raw power and plus athleticism is what makes the prospect of gambling on Washington so appealing. I get it. A comparison that I’ve heard and liked – though it admittedly stretches the limits of my personal firsthand baseball watching days – has stacked up Washington favorably to a young Richard Hidalgo.

I’m not sure I have much to add beyond that. Washington has huge raw power and loads of athleticism, but so many questions about his bat that it’s unclear if it’ll ever matter. “You remember Kentrail Davis? Kinda like that,” was how one scout put it to me when asking about Washington.

They don’t get much rawer than OF Nicholos Hamilton (399), a plus-plus running high schooler out of New York who is incredibly far away from what he’ll eventually be. I had somebody tell me rather prophetically that they’d rather take a chance on going overslot with Hamilton (Note: the Red Sox got him for $100,000, so they didn’t have to dip into their pool money) in the eleventh round than on risking a first round pick on Garrett Whitley.

OF Tyler Spoon, drafted just 1034 spots after his Arkansas teammate Andrew Benintendi, has long been mentioned as a potential professional second base project, but the Red Sox took the idea one step further by having him get some work in behind the plate a little in his debut season. If that experiment works, then Spoon might be a name worth keeping in mind. We’re talking the deepest darkest recesses of your mind, but at least he’d be in there. OF Jerry Downs hit really well in his pro debut. I don’t know much about him, but I’ll be rooting hard for him to become only the eighteenth big league player born in Colombia.

2B Yomar Valentin (368) is a steady glove up the middle with sneaky pop and a high baseball IQ. He was also a really young HS senior (18 this December), something that can also be said for Nick Hamilton. Could be a coincidence or could be that Boston wisely gives extra credit for guys who excel at a young age. 2B Chad De La Guerra has more pop than most middle infielders and picks his spots really well on the base paths. The approach leaves something to be desired, but if he can fake it at short then he might have a shot at working himself into a bat-first utility guy.

C Andrew Noviello is a fascinating player to close on. The local product from Bridgewater-Raynham HS (located just under an hour from Fenway) was a primary second baseman until his senior year of high school. That’s when he began giving catching an honest try in an attempt to make himself more appealing to pro and college teams alike. Good thinking. I also have him in my notes as capable of playing third base and being more than able to hold his own on the mound as a righthanded pitcher. The best part about this is the pick is far more than a team hooking up a local kid and getting some positive PR; Noviello can really hit. If he can show some growth behind the plate in the early going, he’s a real prospect.

Advertisements

2015 MLB Draft – Top 100 D1 College Catching Prospects

Title explains what we’re doing here. Other college prospects and high school guys will get their moment soon enough. I cut the list off at 100, but added in some bonus prospects (in order despite being unnumbered) at the end. First base will be up later in the day.

******

1. Fresno State JR C Taylor Ward (2015): plus to plus-plus arm strength; good athlete; average at best speed; average at best power upside; good defensive tools, but needs reps; arm alone is special enough to carry him up ladder professionally; 6-2, 190 pounds

2013: .195/.306/.336 – 16 BB/26 K – 2/4 SB – 113 AB
2014: .320/.395/.438 – 28 BB/29 K – 3/6 SB – 219 AB
2015: .304/.413/.486 – 35 BB/34 K – 7/7 SB – 214 AB

2. Illinois JR C Jason Goldstein (2015): really good defender; strong arm; good approach; quick bat; exceptionally smart catcher, calls own pitches like a veteran; maybe not the best bat, best glove, or best athlete of the class, but the overall package is big league caliber; FAVORITE; 6-0, 200 pounds

2013: .210/.266/.252 – 9 BB/21 K – 3/3 SB – 143 AB
2014: .316/.370/.435 – 16 BB/17 K – 2/3 SB – 193 AB
2015: .303/.384/.511 – 21 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 188 AB

3. Washington JR C Austin Rei (2015): plus all-around defender; outstanding reputation as a pitch framer; above-average to plus arm; above-average raw power; 5-11, 180 pounds

2013: .240/.356/.260 – 5 BB/11 K – 0/0 SB – 50 AB
2014: .314/.408/.451 – 21 BB/36 K – 1/1 SB – 153 AB
2015: .330/.445/.681 – 12 BB/28 K – 0/0 SB – 91 AB

4. Dallas Baptist rJR C/OF Daniel Salters (2015): plus to plus-plus arm; average to plus raw power, wide range of opinions on his pop but I lean to the plus side; good approach; good athlete; quick bat; above-average glove; decent speed; very divisive prospect that some think of as a fringy corner outfield prospect and others (like me) buy into as a potential first-division starting catcher if it all works; FAVORITE; 6-3, 225 pounds

2014: .251/.398/.454 – 45 BB/29 K – 3/4 SB – 227 AB
2015: .265/.377/.410 – 30 BB/41 K – 4/5 SB – 200 AB

5. Illinois State rJR C/3B Paul DeJong (2015): can also play 2B; average arm; smart hitter; above-average raw power; has made great strides defensively in short order; FAVORITE; 6-1, 200 pounds

2014: .349/.430/.596 – 22 BB/39 K – 2/5 SB – 218 AB
2015: .333/.427/.605 – 28 BB/50 K – 2/3 SB – 210 AB

6. Penn SR C Austin Bossart (2015): strong defender; good arm; physically strong; based on scouting heat, would be surprised if the Orioles don’t consider selecting him higher than many project; 6-2, 210 pounds

2012: .261/.313/.306 – 10 BB/13 K – 6/8 SB – 134 AB
2013: .257/.301/.431 – 4 BB/24 K – 9/10 SB – 144 AB
2014: .297/.397/.430 – 12 BB/29 K – 1/2 SB – 158 AB
2015: .358/.420/.540 – 13 BB/18 K – 6/9 SB – 137 AB

7. USC SR C Garrett Stubbs (2015): really good athlete; versatile defender; good behind plate; average speed; average or better arm; may or may not profile as regular catcher (I think he could), but added value as super-sub makes him intriguing fit for creative team; 5-10, 175 pounds

2012: .205/.299/.244 – 15 BB/17 K – 2/4 SB – 127 AB
2013: .265/.380/.316 – 22 BB/14 K – 2/5 SB – 136 AB
2014: .287/.382/.310 – 16 BB/22 K – 6/11 SB – 171 AB
2015: .330/.421/.415 – 25 BB/27 K – 19/26 SB – 212 AB

8. Houston JR C Ian Rice (2015): great approach; above-average to plus raw power; solid defender, but still learning on job; very impressed at his improvements behind the plate; average arm; bat hasn’t played quite as expected, but approach remains consistent and think he’ll make a quality pro; FAVORITE; 6-0, 190 pounds

2014*: .331/.500/.647 – 44 BB/23 K – 5/6 SB – 139 AB
2015: .258/.431/.371 – 43 BB/32 K – 1/2 SB – 151 AB

9. Stony Brook SR C/SS Cole Peragine (2015): good defensive tools as middle infielder, hands and feet play really well behind plate; strong enough arm, though more good than great; intriguing pop, hasn’t shown up in games quite yet; above-average speed when instincts considered, average raw foot speed; love his approach at the plate; can’t help but fall for a converted shortstop who took to catching as well as he has; FAVORITE; 5-11, 180 pounds

2012: .276/.362/.379 – 21 BB/21 K – 8/10 SB – 214 AB
2013: .264/.352/.323 – 23 BB/21 K – 6/9 SB – 201 AB
2014: .287/.396/.378 – 31 BB/14 K – 13/15 SB – 188 AB
2015: .296/.443/.366 – 47 BB/19 K – 3/4 SB – 186 AB

10. Arizona State JR C RJ Ybarra (2015): plus arm strength; above-average to plus power; slow; good approach; raw defensively; 6-0, 230 pounds

2013: .304/.361/.491 – 5 BB/27 K – 0/0 SB – 112 AB
2014: .273/.342/.394 – 19 BB/45 K – 1/1 SB – 198 AB
2015: .284/.383/.493 – 23 BB/30 K – 1/3 SB – 134 AB

11. Maryland JR C Kevin Martir (2015): above-average raw power; above-average arm; steady glove after lots of work; very well-coached; 5-11, 215 pounds

2014: .269/.359/.386 – 14 BB/28 K – 3/4 SB – 171 AB
2015: .330/.428/.495 – 28 BB/29 K – 3/7 SB – 218 AB

12. Miami SR C Garrett Kennedy (2015): good approach; sneaky pop; average arm; steady glove; 6-1, 200 pounds

2013: .290/.430/.395 – 29 BB/23 K – 0/2 SB – 124 AB
2014: .231/.336/.308 – 15 BB/23 K – 1/1 SB – 117 AB
2015: .347/.448/.518 – 29 BB/24 K – 1/1 SB – 193 AB

13. North Carolina JR C Korey Dunbar (2015): average power; steady glove, tools for more; good approach; plus arm; comfortable with scouting spotlight; 6-0, 215 pounds

2013: .159/.302/.205 – 7 BB/14 K – 1/1 SB – 44 AB
2014: .238/.333/.326 – 24 BB/50 K – 4/6 SB – 181 AB
2015: .288/.362/.484 – 21 BB/46 K – 0/1 SB – 184 AB

14. LSU SR C Kade Scivicque (2015): average or better arm; good defender; leadership abilities evident; 5-11, 220 pounds

2014: .304/.377/.467 – 13 BB/19 K – 0/0 SB – 184 AB
2015: .353/.393/.517 – 12 BB/20 K – 0/0 SB – 201 AB

15. Wagner SR C Nick Dini (2015): has also played 2B and 3B; experienced catching high velocity arms; will be a steal if given a chance; could be Austin Barnes 2.0; FAVORITE; 5-9, 180 pounds

2012: .278/.338/.384 – 16 BB/29 K – 6/7 SB – 198 AB
2013: .316/.369/.460 – 12 BB/15 K – 13/13 SB – 215 AB
2015: .392/.489/.625 – 30 BB/7 K – 14/15 SB – 176 AB

16. Bowling Green rSO C Trey Keegan (2015): quick bat; good athlete; above-average arm; 5-11, 190 pounds

2014: .233/.333/.315 – 10 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 73 AB
2015: .295/.405/.453 – 29 BB/16 K – 8/11 SB – 190 AB

17. Arizona SR C Riley Moore (2015): power upside; above-average arm; good defensive tools, but still a work in progress; great athlete; very quick behind plate; could be better pro than college player; 6-3, 190 pounds

2012: .265/.360/.338 – 34 BB/50 K – 2/5 SB – 219 AB
2013: .244/.394/.343 – 35 BB/26 K – 3/3 SB – 172 AB
2014: .247/.339/.318 – 14 BB/34 K – 1/1 SB – 154 AB
2015: .306/.397/.426 – 32 BB/36 K – 2/3 SB – 209 AB

18. Rice SR C John Clay Reeves (2015): mature defender; accurate arm, average at best arm strength; strong hit tool; even more power upside than he’s shown; has called own games; Arkansas transfer; 6-0, 190 pounds

2014: .317/.360/.439 – 17 BB/32 K – 1/2 SB – 221 AB
2015: .324/.424/.484 – 24 BB/29 K – 3/3 SB – 188 AB

19. UAB rJR C Esteban Tresgallo (2015): good glove; smart; Miami transfer; 6-1, 210 pounds

2012: .243/.335/.379 – 20 BB/46 K – 3/4 SB – 140 AB
2015: .292/.404/.571 – 26 BB/37 K – 8/8 SB – 161 AB

20. Southeastern Louisiana JR C Jameson Fisher (2015): strong hit tool; average or better power; below-average speed; raw defender; labrum surgery caused him to miss 2015 season; no idea about his recovery or signability, but still talented enough to consider using an early pick on to find out; 6-2, 200 pounds

2013: .279/.372/.384 – 21 BB/23 K – 8/16 SB – 219 AB
2014: .389/.481/.469 – 30 BB/29 K – 9/17 SB – 239 AB

21. Morehead State rSR C/OF Chris Robinson (2015): good athlete; plus speed; interesting defensive tools; 5-10

2014: .332/.417/.407 – 26 BB/20 K – 8/10 SB – 226 AB
2015: .402/.472/.654 – 29 BB/31 K – 10/12 SB – 246 AB

22. Wisconsin-Milwaukee JR C Mitch Ghelfi (2015): power upside; great athlete; above-average to plus arm; defense needs work; raw tools stack up with almost any college catching peer; 5-11, 190 pounds

2013: .315/.374/.466 – 14 BB/21 K – 6/9 SB – 146 AB
2014: .267/.352/.342 – 20 BB/31 K – 7/9 SB – 161 AB
2015: .356/.463/.514 – 27 BB/31 K – 4/8 SB – 177 AB

23. Coastal Carolina JR C Casey Schroeder (2015): interesting hit tool; defense needs work, but tools are there; good athlete; above-average arm; big power upside; strong; good approach; average speed; Kentucky transfer; 6-0, 190 pounds

2015: .230/.370/.500 – 33 BB/41 K – 2/3 SB – 174 AB

24. Stetson JR C/1B Pat Mazeika (2015): strong hit tool; above-average raw power; good approach; average at best glove, improving somewhat; wish the glove was a surer bet, but the bat could play elsewhere if need be; 6-3, 220 pounds

2013: .410/.512/.528 – 32 BB/19 K – 1/1 SB – 212 AB
2014: .354/.479/.471 – 34 BB/18 K – 1/1 SB – 206 AB
2015: .307/.439/.485 – 33 BB/16 K – 1/1 SB – 202 AB

25. Belmont SR C/3B Matt Beaty (2015): flat-out hitter; 6-0, 210 pounds

2012: .261/.335/.449 – 25 BB/24 K – 7/10 SB – 234 AB
2013: .291/.402/.449 – 26 BB/19 K – 2/2 SB – 158 AB
2014: .352/.478/.536 – 28 BB/14 K – 4/4 SB – 125 AB
2015: .382/.469/.668 – 32 BB/17 K – 12/14 SB – 238 AB

26. LSU JR C Chris Chinea (2015): good defender; good athlete; plus raw power; have heard from some who think he’s best catcher on LSU roster; 6-0, 210 pounds (2013: .277/.373/.362 – 7 BB/3 K – 0/0 SB – 47 AB) (2014: .250/.310/.395 – 7 BB/4 K – 0/0 SB – 76 AB) (2015: .369/.403/.590 – 12 BB/31 K – 1/2 SB – 222 AB)

27. Georgetown JR C Nick Collins (2015): intriguing bat; average power; quick bat; raw defender, has some trouble actually catching the ball right now; reminded me of Cameron Rupp, but with rougher hands behind plate; 6-2, 220 pounds (2013: .322/.372/.429 – 12 BB/19 K – 0/1 SB – 177 AB) (2014: .351/.418/.426 – 18 BB/27 K – 2/4 SB – 188 AB) (2015: .370/.435/.540 – 22 BB/21 K – 6/7 SB – 211 AB)

28. William & Mary JR C/1B Charley Gould (2015): has consistently produced at the plate; 6-2, 210 pounds (2014: .333/.406/.567 – 16 BB/32 K – 0/0 SB – 150 AB) (2015: .388/.473/.706 – 24 BB/28 K – 0/1 SB – 170 AB)

29. Georgia JR C Zack Bowers (2015): plus arm strength; plus raw power; defense needs work; 6-1, 200 pounds (2013: .240/.286/.462 – 6 BB/36 K – 0/0 SB – 104 AB) (2014: .189/.299/.302 – 18 BB/43 K – 2/2 SB – 159 AB) (2015: .252/.421/.503 – 37 BB/55 K – 2/3 SB – 155 AB)

30. East Carolina JR C/1B Luke Lowery (2015): above-average to plus raw power, others have it plus-plus and maybe the raw is there, but hit tool keeps it from playing to full potential in game; plus bat speed; average speed, moves well for big man; all-or-nothing approach stems from timing issues; defense needs work; some think he could handle corner OF; “Schwarber level glove” behind plate; want to like him more than I do; 6-2, 240 pounds (2013: .304/.347/.489 – 6 BB/31 K – 1/2 SB – 92 AB) (2014: .287/.321/.400 – 6 BB/47 K – 3/8 SB – 160 AB) (2015: .313/.411/.561 – 25 BB/55 K – 7/9 SB – 198 AB)

31. Oregon SR C/1B Shaun Chase (2015): plus-plus raw power; strong arm; questionable glove, but playable; one of the draft’s most intriguing underachievers who could surprise in pro ball; 6-0, 215 pounds (2013: .230/.313/.368 – 10 BB/39 K – 0/1 SB – 87 AB) (2014: .283/.352/.634 – 15 BB/49 K – 1/2 SB – 145 AB) (2015: .191/.333/.391 – 20 BB/47 K – 0/0 SB – 115 AB)

32. Harvard SR C/3B Ethan Ferreira (2015): smart; interesting bat; 6-0, 200 pounds (2012: .231/.293/.297 – 8 BB/28 K – 3/6 SB – 91 AB) (2013: .224/.384/.276 – 15 BB/13 K – 0/1 SB – 58 AB) (2014: .238/.308/.300 – 9 BB/24 K – 0/0 SB – 130 AB) (2015: .361/.425/.594 – 18 BB/22 K – 4/6 SB – 155 AB)

33. Old Dominion C/JR 3B PJ Higgins (2015): gap power; strong arm; could also play 2B or OF; 5-11, 185 pounds (2013: .336/.380/.434 – 6 BB/16 K – 1/3 SB – 113 AB) (2014: .308/.361/.368 – 22 BB/22 K – 7/9 SB – 250 AB) (2015: .335/.402/.452 – 25 BB/16 K – 3/5 SB – 239 AB)

34. South Florida JR C/3B Levi Borders (2015): average or better raw power; good glove; average arm; approach holds him back; 6-3, 185 pounds (2013: .232/.301/.312 – 10 BB/41 K – 1/3 SB – 138 AB) (2014: .243/.341/.317 – 17 BB/41 K – 1/1 SB – 189 AB) (2015: .295/.381/.498 – 17 BB/63 K – 4/4 SB – 217 AB)

35. Illinois-Chicago SR C/OF Tyler Detmer (2015): relatively new to position; good arm; good approach; power upside; 6-0, 180 pounds (2013: .285/.364/.375 – 20 BB/36 K – 3/8 SB – 200 AB) (2014: .330/.436/.470 – 28 BB/25 K – 2/2 SB – 185 AB) (2015: .351/.452/.534 – 25 BB/34 K – 1/2 SB – 208 AB)

36. UC Davis JR C Cameron Olson (2015): plus raw power; plus arm; defense improving; hasn’t gotten reps, but upside is there; 6-1, 220 pounds (2013: .286/.365/.381 – 5 BB/24 K – 0/0 SB – 84 AB) (2015: .208/.323/.453 – 6 BB/18 K – 1/1 SB – 53 AB)

37. Connecticut JR C Max McDowell (2015): good athlete; good speed; good defender; power upside; has the well-rounded skill set of a steady backup catcher; 6-2, 210 pounds (2013: .275/.379/.357 – 19 BB/23 K – 6/8 SB – 171 AB) (2014: .275/.376/.352 – 22 BB/18 K – 3/7 SB – 182 AB) (2015: .286/.392/.418 – 24 BB/27 K – 2/5 SB – 213 AB)

38. Oklahoma JR C/RHP Anthony Hermelyn (2015): average or better hit tool; good approach; good glove; 92-94 FB; has also played 1B and 3B; 6-1, 210 pounds (2013: .275/.356/.309 – 23 BB/29 K – 2/3 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .289/.339/.360 – 15 BB/29 K – 1/2 SB – 211 AB) (2015: .321/.360/.453 – 15 BB/21 K – 3/5 SB – 243 AB)

39. Cal Poly JR C Brian Mundell (2015): good frame; nice swing; quick bat; 6-3, 225 pounds (2013: .270/.349/.480 – 22 BB/44 K – 2/3 SB – 204 AB) (2014: .279/.374/.409 – 39 BB/47 K – 1/1 SB – 215 AB) (2015: .282/.377/.447 – 26 BB/27 K – 0/2 SB – 170 AB)

40. Georgia State JR C Joey Roach (2015): good glove; 5-11, 200 pounds (2013: .287/.366/.487 – 12 BB/20 K – 2/4 SB – 115 AB) (2014: .301/.379/.432 – 13 BB/27 K – 1/1 SB – 146 AB) (2015: .302/.381/.473 – 20 BB/25 K – 1/1 SB – 205 AB)

41. Georgia Southern SR C Chase Griffin (2015): big raw power; can also play 1B or OF; strong; impressive bat speed; rough behind plate, but has gotten better over years; strong arm; anticipated breakout has yet to come; 6-0, 200 pounds (2012: .310/.395/.523 – 22 BB/48 K – 2/2 SB – 197 AB) (2013: .264/.339/.360 – 27 BB/47 K – 0/0 SB – 239 AB) (2014: .258/.336/.369 – 22 BB/42 K – 2/3 SB – 217 AB) (2015: .265/.304/.404 – 13 BB/56 K – 2/2 SB – 223 AB)

42. Stetson SR C/OF Garrett Russini (2015): strong arm; power upside; steady glove; good approach; good athlete; 6-0, 200 pounds (2013: .271/.348/.350 – 25 BB/45 K – 0/0 SB – 203 AB) (2014: .297/.365/.482 – 21 BB/30 K – 3/3 SB – 222 AB) (2015: .272/.358/.401 – 24 BB/43 K – 0/0 SB – 202 AB)

43. Winthrop JR C Roger Gonzales (2015): plus defender; Miami transfer; 5-9, 190 pounds (2015: .335/.409/.425 – 21 BB/28 K – 1/1 SB – 167 AB)

44. UCLA JR C Darrell Miller (2015): strong arm; raw defender; 6-2, 220 pounds (2015: .254/.321/.353 – 14 BB/22 K – 0/0 SB – 173 AB)

45. Stanford JR C Austin Barr (2015): raw defensively; plus arm; power upside; good athlete; quick bat; 6-2, 215 pounds (2014: .146/.205/.268 – 2 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 41 AB) (2015: .241/.356/.348 – 18 BB/30 K – 0/0 SB – 112 AB)

46. San Diego SR C Jesse Jenner (2015): average or better power; strong arm; good athlete; slow; 6-0, 200 pounds (2014: .348/.371/.447 – 9 BB/15 K – 4/6 SB – 161 AB) (2015: .314/.407/.415 – 14 BB/17 K – 3/6 SB – 159 AB)

47. California JR C/3B Mitchell Kranson (2015): has experience calling own games; area guys rave about him; 5-8, 200 pounds (2013: .288/.333/.365 – 7 BB/13 K – 1/1 SB – 104 AB) (2014: .231/.283/.317 – 7 BB/13 K – 0/1 SB – 104 AB) (2015: .252/.285/.422 – 4 BB/10 K – 0/0 SB – 147 AB)

48. Xavier JR C Dan Rizzie (2015): quick bat; plus defender; 6-2, 180 pounds (2014: .307/.395/.459 – 28 BB/37 K – 9/12 SB – 218 AB) (2015: .275/.373/.275 – 6 BB/10 K – 2/2 SB – 51 AB)

49. Seattle SR C Brian Olson (2015): good defender; power upside; 6-0, 190 pounds (2012: .289/.393/.382 – 23 BB/16 K – 1/3 SB – 152 AB) (2013: .273/.374/.304 – 26 BB/41 K – 1/2 SB – 194 AB) (2014: .320/.393/.458 – 22 BB/26 K – 2/2 SB – 203 AB) (2015: .267/.382/.388 – 38 BB/35 K – 2/6 SB – 206 AB)

50. Maine JR C Kevin Stypulkowski (2015): accurate arm; steady glove; Florida transfer; 6-2, 220 pounds (2013: .184/.262/.211 – 2 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 38 AB) (2015: .254/.324/.377 – 15 BB/15 K – 2/4 SB – 130 AB)

51. Nebraska SR C Tanner Lubach (2015): average or better (underrated) hit tool; some power upside; good approach; improving behind plate, has gone from not so good to pretty impressive; very smart defender; 6-0, 190 pounds (2013: .252/.322/.337 – 15 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 163 AB) (2014: .282/.337/.423 – 13 BB/27 K – 1/1 SB – 149 AB) (2015: .312/.375/.441 – 14 BB/29 K – 2/3 SB – 186 AB)

52. North Florida JR C Keith Skinner (2015): power upside; good approach; 6-1, 210 pounds (2015: .325/.395/.429 – 19 BB/19 K – 0/1 SB – 154 AB)

53. Fordham JR C Charles Galiano (2015): good defender; good approach; good athlete; above-average arm; 6-0, 200 pounds (2013: .253/.363/.348 – 11 BB/38 K – 3/3 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .280/.348/.418 – 11 BB/38 K – 0/2 SB – 182 AB) (2015: .301/.370/.474 – 12 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 196 AB)

54. Southern Mississippi SR C Austin Roussel (2015): 6-0, 210 pounds (2014: .213/.348/.329 – 32 BB/18 K – 3/3 SB – 164 AB) (2015: .278/.418/.435 – 26 BB/8 K – 1/2 SB – 115 AB)

55. UNLV SR C/OF Erik VanMeetren (2015): 6-4, 210 pounds (2012: .264/.359/.391 – 10 BB/19 K – 1/1 SB – 87 AB) (2013: .273/.361/.326 – 25 BB/36 K – 4/7 SB – 187 AB) (2014: .291/.391/.394 – 29 BB/44 K – 7/9 SB – 213 AB) (2015: .301/.447/.475 – 38 BB/36 K – 4/9 SB – 183 AB)

56. Georgetown SR C AC Carter (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2014: .245/.366/.322 – 22 BB/20 K – 0/0 SB – 143 AB) (2015: .316/.410/.468 – 23 BB/23 K – 0/1 SB – 190 AB)

57. Middle Tennessee State SR C/RHP Michael Adkins (2015): plus defender; plus arm; power upside; 88-92 FB; 6-1, 200 pounds (2013: .225/.292/.324 – 15 BB/42 K – 0/0 SB – 182 AB) (2014: .282/.358/.352 – 18 BB/29 K – 1/2 SB – 142 AB) (2015: .245/.307/.328 – 15 BB/44 K – 1/1 SB – 192 AB)

58. Tennessee JR C David Houser (2015): plus defender; strong arm; 6-2, 220 pounds (2013: .183/.271/.217 – 11 BB/38 K – 0/2 SB – 115 AB) (2014: .229/.279/.266 – 6 BB/44 K – 1/1 SB – 109 AB) (2015: .277/.375/.313 – 11 BB/20 K – 0/0 SB – 83 AB)

59. Duke rSR C Mike Rosenfeld (2015): elite defensive upside; 5-10, 185 pounds (2012: .329/.403/.476 – 16 BB/48 K – 170 AB – 7/8 SB) (2013: .377/.451/.525 – 8 BB/9 K – 2/3 SB – 61 AB) (2014: .268/.396/.335 – 32 BB/42 K – 7 – 11/SB – 194 AB) (2015: .278/.411/.377 – 32 BB/32 K – 10/11 SB – 162 AB)

60. Florida State SR C Daniel De La Calle (2015): plus defender; plus arm; way too much swing and miss; 6-3, 220 pounds (2014: .224/.315/.241 – 17 BB/37 K – 1/1 SB – 174 AB) (2015: .261/.303/.457 – 10 BB/57 K – 2/3 SB – 184 AB)

61. Texas A&M SR C Mitchell Nau (2015): solid power; steady defender, I like him behind plate more than others; good footwork; quick release; good approach; decent runner; 5-10, 200 pounds (2012: .200/.261/.233 – 6 BB/12 K – 0/1 SB – 60 AB) (2013: .226/.287/.323 – 8 BB/13 K – 0/0 SB – 124 AB) (2014: .274/.319/.345 – 3 BB/10 K – 1/1 SB – 84 AB) (2015: .376/.470/.510 – 28 BB/28 K – 1/2 SB – 194 AB)

62. Indiana SR C/OF Brian Hartong (2015): good athlete; strong; good defender; 6-5, 215 pounds (2014: .313/.345/.450 – 6 BB/12 K – 7/8 SB – 160 AB) (2015: .300/.361/.382 – 14 BB/24 K – 0/1 SB – 220 AB)

63. Rice JR C Hunter Kopycinski (2015): plus arm; good athlete; 5-11, 180 pounds (2013: .300/.341/.425 – 3 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 40 AB) (2014: .262/.340/.262 – 5 BB/6 K – 0/0 SB – 42 AB) (2015: .312/.364/.348 – 9 BB/11 K – 0/1 SB – 138 AB)

64. Northwestern State SR C CJ Webster (2015): good defender; strong arm; leader behind dish; Fullerton transfer; 6-2, 200 pounds (2014: .255/.335/.319 – 13 BB/26 K – 0/1 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .271/.359/.392 – 22 BB/31 K – 0/1 SB – 199 AB)

65. Northwestern State JR C/OF Cort Brinson (2015): power upside; good athlete; 6-0, 205 pounds (2014: .294/.409/.418 – 16 BB/18 K – 5/6 SB – 170 AB) (2015: .350/.407/.518 – 12 BB/35 K – 3/4 SB – 220 AB)

66. Southern Illinois Edwardsville SR C Parker Guinn (2015): 5-10, 180 pounds (2015: .269/.367/.552 – 17 BB/21 K – 1/3 SB – 145 AB)

67. VMI rSR C Matt Winn (2015): strong glove; 6-0, 220 pounds (2013: .320/.439/.438 – 19 BB/37 K – 0/0 SB – 153 AB) (2014: .204/.389/.276 – 16 BB/27 K – 1/1 SB – 152 AB) (2015: .304/.391/.586 – 28 BB/49 K – 0/1 SB – 191 AB)

68. Western Carolina JR C Danny Bermudez (2015): good glove; 5-11, 215 pounds (2014: .305/.443/.381 – 16 BB/28 K – 3/5 SB – 105 AB) (2015: .324/.422/.527 – 19 BB/48 K – 3/3 SB – 182 AB)

69. San Diego State rJR C/OF Seby Zavala (2015): 6-0, 180 pounds (2012: .276/.372/.366 – 19 BB/30 K – 4/5 SB – 123 AB) (2014: .297/.387/.397 – 28 BB/44 K – 2/6 SB – 232 AB) (2015: .283/.396/.539 – 29 BB/48 K – 4/6 SB – 219 AB)

70. Oklahoma JR C Chris Shaw (2015): power upside; much improved defender; second best Chris Shaw in class; FAVORITE; 6-1, 200 pounds (2013*: .372/.479/.715 – 22 BB/40 K – 4/6 SB – 172 AB) (2014*: .384/.471/.707 – 27 BB/35 K – 0/0 SB – 198 AB) (2015: .247/.316/.406 – 7 BB/36 K – 1/2 SB – 170 AB)

71. Michigan rSR C Kendall Patrick (2015): 6-2, 220 pounds (2015: .242/.399/.439 – 22 BB/34 K – 0/0 SB – 132 AB)

72. Oklahoma State SR C Bryan Case (2015): strong arm; 6-3, 200 pounds (2014: .262/.398/.488 – 12 BB/22 K – 2/4 SB – 84 AB) (2015: .241/.328/.429 – 14 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 112 AB)

73. Oklahoma State SR C/OF Gage Green (2015): good speed; solid athlete; 5-10, 195 pounds (2012: .220/.343/.322 – 9 BB/11 K – 5/5 SB – 59 AB) (2013: .298./408/.416 – 23 BB/39 K – 13/17 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .310/.392/.423 – 20 BB/44 K – 20/22 SB – 239 AB) (2015: .284/.398/.408 – 26 BB/43 K – 18/21 SB – 211 AB)

74. Mississippi SR C Austin Knight (2015): power upside; strong defensive tools; 5-11, 200 pounds (2012: .267/.371/.267 – 4 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 30 AB) (2013: .167/.192/.208 – 1 BB/9 K – 0/0 SB – 24 AB) (2014: .303/.324/.303 – 1 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 33 AB) (2015: .268/.354/.362 – 14 BB/28 K – 0/1 SB – 138 AB)

75. Virginia JR C/RHP Robbie Coman (2015): good glove; 6-1, 200 pounds (2014: .283/.377/.368 – 13 BB/9 K – 106 AB) (2015: .309/.366/.364 – 13 BB/15 K – 2/6 SB – 165 AB)

76. Michigan SR C/OF Kevin White (2015): average power; strong arm; 6-0, 215 pounds (2012: .248/.328/.349 – 13 BB/45 K – 2/5 SB – 109 AB) (2013: .290/.348/.426 – 15 BB/40 K – 9/10 SB – 162 AB) (2014: .253/.293/.373 – 5 BB/26 K – 4/5 SB – 75 AB) (2015: .274/.432/.396 – 27 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 106 AB)

77. Central Michigan SR C Tyler Huntey (2015): great athlete; 6-3, 210 pounds (2014: .329/.393/.460 – 15 BB/34 K – 13/15 SB – 237 AB) (2015: .266/.365/.356 – 27 BB/44 K – 4/5 SB – 222 AB)

78. Texas-San Antonio SR C John Bormann (2015): steady glove; above-average arm; 6-0, 200 pounds (2014: .288/.341/.404 – 10 BB/28 K – 4/8 SB – 208 AB) (2015: .273/.384/.398 – 22 BB/28 K – 4/4 SB – 216 AB)

79. Southeast Missouri State JR C/1B Garrett Gandolfo (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2015: .303/.427/.528 – 40 BB/41 K – 1/2 SB – 178 AB)

80. William & Mary JR C Ryan Hissey (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2015: .290/.400/.525 – 23 BB/36 K – 1/2 SB – 162 AB)

81. Belmont SR C/1B Alec Diamond (2015): 5-10, 175 pounds (2013: .357/.444/.390 – 25 BB/15 K – 5/9 SB – 154 AB) (2014: .293/.375/.351 – 23 BB/17 K – 4/6 SB – 188 AB) (2015: .323/.427/.358 – 35 BB/8 K – 7/10 SB – 226 AB)

82. Houston Baptist SR C Samm Wiggins (2015): 5-8, 175 pounds (2014: .273/.392/.335 – 26 BB/22 K – 3/3 SB – 161 AB) (2015: .328/.419/.497 – 26 BB/30 K – 0/4 SB – 195 AB)

83. St. John’s rJR C Tyler Sanchez (2015): good glove; 6-3, 220 pounds (2014: .246/.350/.336 – 14 BB/24 K – 0/0 SB – 134 AB) (2015: .231/.336/.405 – 14 BB/22 K – 1/1 SB – 121 AB)

84. UC Irvine rSR C Jerry McClanahan (2015): good glove; 6-2, 200 pounds (2012: .265/.407/.378 – 20 BB/12 K – 0/2 SB – 98 AB) (2013: .252/.427/.311 – 27 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 135 AB) (2014: .304/.377/.343 – 29 BB/33 K – 3/5 SB – 207 AB) (2015: .276/.434/.354 – 44 BB/30 K – 1/3 SB – 181 AB)

85. Eastern Michigan rSO C/OF Michael Mioduszewski (2015): strong; great athlete; 6-4, 240 pounds (2014: .248/.329/.348 – 13 BB/32 K – 5/6 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .259/.315/.330 – 12 BB/53 K – 4/7 SB – 197 AB)

86. Alabama SO C Will Haynie (2015): plus raw power; plus arm; good defender; old Ben Davis comp; clearly not ready for the pro game, but raw power is no joke; 6-5, 230 pounds (2014: .177/.231/.274 – 7 BB/51 K – 0/0 SB – 113 AB) (2015: .195/.299/.391 – 21 BB/80 K – 1/2 SB – 169 AB)

87. Butler SR C/1B Ryan Wojciechowski (2015): power upside; 6-0, 210 pounds (2015: .316/.403/.497 – 27 BB/38 K – 2/3 SB – 187 AB)

88. Southeastern Louisiana SR C Sam Roberson (2015): out in 2015; 5-11, 190 pounds (2013: .209/.283/.264 – 20 BB/30 K – 7/11 SB – 201 AB) (2014: .296/.380/.423 – 20 BB/28 K – 8/11 SB – 189 AB)

89. Central Michigan SR C/1B Tommy Monnot (2015): strong arm; good defensive tools; 6-3, 210 pounds (2012: .324/.390/.437 – 6 BB/13 K – 0/0 SB – 71 AB) (2013: .219/.286/.290 – 10 BB/29 K – 1/1 SB – 169 AB) (2014: .186/.250/.291 – 6 BB/8 K – 0/0 SB – 86 AB) (2015: .244/.328/.452 – 11 BB/24 K – 2/2 SB – 168 AB)

90. Bucknell JR C Jon Mayer (2015): strong arm; raw defender; 6-2, 210 pounds (2013: .231/.286/.282 – 1 BB/12 K – 1/1 SB – 39 AB) (2014: .246/.340/.381 – 11 BB/30 K – 0/0 SB – 118 AB) (2015: .276/.382/.379 – 17 BB/19 K – 0/1 SB – 145 AB)

91. Western Illinois SR C JJ Reimer (2015): good glove; 5-11, 200 pounds (2014: .319/.374/.429 – 7 BB/17 K – 3/4 SB – 91 AB) (2015: .286/.402/.387 – 22 BB/22 K – 8/9 SB – 168 AB)

92. Louisiana SR C/3B Evan Powell (2015): good defender; LSU transfer; 5-10, 205 pounds (2014: .250/.370/.517 – 9 BB/17 K – 2/2 SB – 60 AB) (2015: .232/.333/.377 – 17 BB/26 K – 8/13 SB – 138 AB)

93. Nevada SR C Jordan Devencenzi (2015): good glove; good arm; 6-0, 210 pounds (2014: .265/.326/.311 – 5 BB/13 K – 1/4 SB – 196 AB) (2015: .294/.359/.382 – 9 BB/14 K – 3/9 SB – 170 AB)

94. Louisiana-Monroe JR C Dalton Todd (2015): really smart catcher; 5-11, 175 pounds (2013: .150/.227/.250 – 7 BB/29 K – 1/1 SB – 80 AB) (2014: .170/.302/.226 – 6 BB/14 K – 1/2 SB – 53 AB) (2015: .262/.402/.330 – 23 BB/27 K – 1/2 SB – 103 AB)

95. High Point SR C Josh Spano (2015): great arm; steady glove; power upside; 6-2, 215 pounds (2013: .311/.367/.387 – 19 BB/34 K – 1/1 SB – 225 AB) (2014: .279/.335/.365 – 17 BB/31 K – 0/0 SB – 208 AB) (2015: .288/.336/.418 – 9 BB/22 K – 2/4 SB – 208 AB)

96. Southeastern Louisiana JR C Chris Eades (2015): strong arm; power upside; 6-3, 240 pounds (2015: .262/.383/.384 – 21 BB/54 K – 1/1 SB – 164 AB)

97. Florida International JR C Zack Soria (2015): good glove; 5-10, 200 pounds (2015: .293/.370/.337 – 19 BB/31 K – 4/5 SB – 205 AB)

98. Central Connecticut State JR C Connor Fitzsimmons (2015): plus arm; good athlete; above-average glove; 5-9, 180 pounds (2013: .226/.293/.250 – 5 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 84 AB) (2014: .230/.314/.291 – 8 BB/33 K – 2/2 SB – 148 AB) (2015: .263/.356/.321 – 14 BB/37 K – 0/1 SB – 137 AB)

99. Louisiana JR C Nick Thurman (2015): good defender; 6-2, 210 pounds (2013: .294/.339/.373 – 2 BB/15 K – 1/2 SB – 51 AB) (2014: .222/.364/.315 – 5 BB/22 K – 0/0 SB – 54 AB) (2015: .272/.346/.359 – 24 BB/52 K – 4/4 SB – 206 AB)

100. Nicholls State SR C Christian Correa (2015): good glove; 5-10, 200 pounds (2015: .261/.354/.345 – 12 BB/22 K – 1/3 SB – 142 AB)

*****

Cal State Fullerton JR C AJ Kennedy (2015): plus defender; plus pitch-framer; strong arm; bag is a major question; 6-0, 190 pounds (2014: .178/.268/.205 – 9 BB/15 K – 1/1 SB – 73 AB) (2015: .171/.263/.217 – 17 BB/42 K – 0/2 SB – 152 AB)

Mississippi State SR C Cody Walker (2015): good defensive tools; strong arm; quick transfer; catches ball well; bat lags behind; 5-10, 200 pounds (2014: .222/.382/.296 – 6 BB/6 K – 0/0 SB – 27 AB) (2015: .259/.375/.481 – 4 BB/5 K – 0/0 SB – 27 AB)

UC Riverside JR C Matthew Ellis (2015): plus arm; good glove; 6-1, 170 pounds (2014: .249/.335/.272 – 22 BB/31 K – 2/4 SB – 169 AB) (2015: .207/.246/.259 – 4 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 116 AB)

Albany SR C Craig Lepre (2015): really good glove; 6-2, 200 pounds (2014: .273/.341/.338 – 10 BB/17 K – 0/0 SB – 154 AB) (2015: .214/.318/.286 – 15 BB/13 K – 0/2 SB – 126 AB)

Texas A&M JR C Michael Barash (2015): steady glove; average or better arm; LSU transfer; 6-1, 200 pounds (2015: .239/.322/.284 – 14 BB/19 K – 1/3 SB – 134 AB)

Mount St. Mary’s SR C Andrew Clow (2015): 5-10, 185 pounds (2014: .369/.415/.468 – 12 BB/17 K – 5/7 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .346/.394/.497 – 10 BB/16 K – 3/4 SB – 159 AB)

Towson rSO C Chris Henze (2015): 6-3, 215 pounds (2015: .331/.419/.503 – 22 BB/37 K – 3/5 SB – 151 AB)

UNC Wilmington rSO C Gavin Stupienski (2015): 6-2, 220 pounds (2014: .257/.364/.343 – 7 BB/10 K – 0/0 SB – 35 AB) (2015: .341/.410/.517 – 20 BB/29 K – 2/2 SB – 176 AB)

Alabama State rSO C Chris Biocic (2015): 6-3, 200 pounds (2015: .357/.428/.485 – 17 BB/27 K – 12/15 SB – 171 AB)

Texas-San Antonio JR C/OF Kevin Markham (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2015: .311/.393/.505 – 26 BB/44 K – 8/11 SB – 222 AB)

Butler JR C Chris Marras (2015): 5-11, 200 pounds (2015: .304/.404/.467 – 21 BB/22 K – 3/3 SB – 135 AB)

Oral Roberts rSR C/1B Audie Afenir (2015): 6-2, 220 pounds (2015: .347/.424/.472 – 29 BB/44 K – 0/0 SB – 216 AB)

South Dakota State SR C Reid Clary (2015): 6-4, 200 pounds (2014: .256/.353/.316 – 17 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 117 AB) (2015: .293/.398/.448 – 27 BB/28 K – 6/8 SB – 174 AB)

North Dakota State JR C/OF Taylor Sanders (2015): 5-9, 190 pounds (2015: .344/.414/.432 – 12 BB/12 K – 1/1 SB – 125 AB)

Fairleigh Dickinson rJR C Patrick McClure (2015): 6-0, 210 pounds (2014: .271/.335/.336 – 10 BB/22 K – 0/0 SB – 140 AB) (2015: .276/.405/.418 – 21 BB/18 K – 0/0 SB – 134 AB)

Army JR C Ben Smith (2015): 5-10, 180 pounds (2015: .310/.404/.439 – 17 BB/21 K – 1/4 SB – 155 AB)

Valparaiso JR C/OF Daniel Delaney (2015): 5-11, 200 pounds (2015: .325/.400/.439 – 27 BB/30 K – 2/3 SB – 212 AB)

Central Florida SR C Jordan Savinon (2015): 6-3, 215 pounds (2015: .299/.387/.470 – 17 BB/34 K – 0/0 SB – 134 AB)

UC Davis SR C Izaak Silva (2015): 5-10, 185 pounds (2015: .320/.392/.456 – 24 BB/38 K – 6/9 SB – 206 AB)

Northwestern rSR C Scott Heelan (2015): Virginia Tech transfer; 5-10, 180 pounds (2014: .317/.393/.413 – 17 BB/16 K – 1/3 SB – 189 AB) (2015: .332/.386/.428 – 17 BB/11 K – 1/1 SB – 208 AB)

Iowa JR C Daniel Aaron Moriel (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2015: .281/.455/.404 – 14 BB/7 K – 0/0 SB – 57 AB)

Siena JR C Dave Hoffmann (2015): 6-0, 175 pounds (2014: .255/.341/.340 – 18 BB/26 K – 0/0 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .242/.387/.409 – 27 BB/32 K – 0/0 SB – 132 AB)

Texas State JR C/1B Tanner Hill (2015): 6-1, 250 pounds (2014: .220/.302/.353 – 14 BB/29 K – 0/0 SB – 150 AB) (2015: .319/.379/.511 – 16 BB/35 K – 2/4 SB – 188 AB)

Saint Louis JR C Jake Henson (2015): 6-0, 215 pounds (2013: .297/.387/.453 – 9 BB/9 K – 0/0 SB – 64 AB) (2014: .244/.313/.344 – 14 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 131 AB) (2015: .327/.366/.531 – 11 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 211 AB)

High Point SR C/1B Spencer Angelis (2015): 6-2, 200 pounds (2013: .314/.388/.415 – 22 BB/27 K – 0/0 SB – 188 AB) (2014: .390/.477/.512 – 27 BB/16 K – 0/4 SB – 213 AB) (2015: .333/.439/.471 – 29 BB/37 K – 3/5 SB – 174 AB)

Columbia JR C Logan Boyher (2015): 5-10, 200 pounds (2013: .273/.293/.382 – 1 BB/9 K – 0/1 SB – 55 AB) (2014: .253/.306/.303 – 2 BB/22 K – 0/1 SB – 99 AB) (2015: .303/.422/.449 – 17 BB/23 K – 2/2 SB – 89 AB)

Liberty SR C Becker Sankey (2015): 6-0, 215 pounds (2014: .221/.335/.322 – 12 BB/32 K – 0/0 SB – 149 AB) (2015: .267/.379/.503 – 29 BB/58 K – 1/3 SB – 195 AB)

New Mexico State JR C Brent Hermanussen (2015): 6-3, 215 pounds (2015: .291/.366/.480 – 14 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 127 AB)

Presbyterian SR C Cam McRae (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2014: .267/.324/.403 – 10 BB/23 K – 4/8 SB – 191 AB) (2015: .364/.407/.525 – 11 BB/39 K – 7/10 SB – 217 AB)

Utah JR C AJ Young (2015): 6-3, 220 pounds (2013: .211/.328/.321 – 16 BB/38 K – 0/0 SB – 109 AB) (2014: .203/.372/.216 – 16 BB/29 K – 0/0 SB – 74 AB) (2015: .297/.407/.446 – 27 BB/49 K – 3/6 SB – 175 AB)

Xavier SR C/1B Derek Hasenbeck (2015): 6-2, 210 pounds (2012: .253/.351/.343 – 29 BB/32 K – 1/5 SB – 198 AB) (2013: .261/.390/.400 – 31 BB/29 K – 0/0 SB – 180 AB) (2014: .309/.387/.428 – 30 BB/33 K – 0/2 SB – 236 AB) (2015: .282/.343/.426 – 16 BB/30 K – 1/1 SB – 188 AB)

Bradley SR C Drew Carlile (2015): 6-3, 230 pounds (2015: .283/.320/.478 – 7 BB/19 K – 3/4 SB – 138 AB)

New Jersey Tech JR C Stephan Halibej (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2013: .281/.366/.399 – 14 BB/32 K – 2/2 SB – 178 AB) (2014: .268/.315/.366 – 5 BB/11 K – 0/0 SB – 82 AB) (2015: .301/.368/.416 – 17 BB/25 K – 0/1 SB – 173 AB)

Texas Southern rJR C Javier Valdez (2015): 5-8, 160 pounds (2015: .298/.384/.405 – 19 BB/13 K – 2/3 SB – 131 AB)

Kennesaw State JR C Brennan Morgan (2015): 6-4, 225 pounds (2014: .281/.357/.386 – 20 BB/34 K – 2/3 SB – 210 AB) (2015: .276/.383/.400 – 29 BB/31 K – 5/6 SB – 185 AB)

Saint Louis SR C/OF Colton Frabasilio (2015): 6-3, 210 pounds (2014: .253/.353/.296 – 20 BB/21 K – 2/3 SB – 162 AB) (2015: .313/.381/.460 – 19 BB/28 K – 1/2 SB – 211 AB)

Fairfield SR C Sebastian Salvo (2015): 6-2, 235 pounds (2014: .354/.426/.505 – 11 BB/14 K – 0/1 SB – 99 AB) (2015: .283/.367/.428 – 20 BB/37 K – 2/3 SB – 173 AB)

Kansas State JR C Tyler Moore (2015): 5-11, 190 pounds (2015: .302/.371/.465 – 15 BB/33 K – 2/3 SB – 172 AB)

North Florida SR C James Abbatinozzi (2015): 6-1, 220 pounds (2014: .314/.402/.353 – 13 BB/20 K – 3/3 SB – 102 AB) (2015: .315/.425/.391 – 17 BB/14 K – 2/3 SB – 92 AB)

Prairie View A&M SR C Grant Dougherty (2015): 6-1, 190 pounds (2014: .258/.350/.368 – 18 BB/27 K – 6/6 SB – 155 AB) (2015: .321/.468/.404 – 38 BB/38 K – 23/30 SB – 156 AB)

Incarnate Word SR C Colton Besett (2015): 6-0, 185 pounds (2015: .256/.369/.444 – 17 BB/32 K – 1/2 SB – 117 AB)

Ohio rJR C Cody Gaertner (2015): 5-10, 175 pounds (2012: .338/.369/.411 – 6 BB/12 K – 4/7 SB – 151 AB) (2013: .256/.325/.341 – 16 BB/21 K – 5/11 SB – 176 AB) (2015: .295/.363/.411 – 18 BB/27 K – 2/4 SB – 224 AB)

Old Dominion SR C Mike Perez (2015): 5-11, 210 pounds (2013: .275/.353/.470 – 16 BB/30 K – 1/2 SB – 149 AB) (2014: .244/.321/.382 – 15 BB/23 K – 0/0 SB – 123 AB) (2015: .276/.365/.412 – 15 BB/36 K – 1/1 SB – 170 AB)

Southeast Missouri State JR C Scott Mitchell (2015): 5-10, 160 pounds (2014: .291/.402/.333 – 25 BB/24 K – 3/4 SB – 141 AB) (2015: .316/.399/.395 – 20 BB/19 K – 0/0 SB – 152 AB)

Ohio State SR C Aaron Gretz (2015): 6-0, 200 pounds (2012: .253/.384/.286 – 19 BB/18 K – 1/2 SB – 91 AB) (2013: .259/.361/.304 – 25 BB/25 K – 0/1 SB – 158 AB) (2014: .284/.381/.367 – 17 BB/11 K – 1/1 SB – 109 AB) (2015: .279/.370/.367 – 23 BB/21 K – 0/0 SB – 147 AB)

Radford rSR C Josh Reavis (2015): 6-1, 200 pounds (2014: .264/.382/.360 – 27 BB/32 K – 11/13 SB – 178 AB) (2015: .291/.413/.398 – 30 BB/42 K – 10/12 SB – 196 AB)

NC State JR C Chance Shepard (2015): 6-1, 230 pounds (2014: .234/.379/.394 – 22 BB/34 K – 1/3 SB – 94 AB) (2015: .200/.347/.425 – 19 BB/32 K – 1/1 SB – 80 AB)

The Citadel JR C Stephen Windham (2015): 6-0, 190 pounds (2015: .305/.398/.416 – 28 BB/44 K – 0/2 SB – 190 AB)

Quinnipiac JR C/1B Lou Iannotti (2015): 6-3, 170 pounds (2015: .284/.353/.376 – 18 BB/23 K – 10/11 SB – 197 AB)

North Dakota State rSO C JT Core (2015): 6-2, 210 pounds (2015: .299/.409/.381 – 17 BB/16 K – 1/1 SB – 97 AB)

Charleston Southern SR C Andrew Widell (2015): 5-10, 190 pounds (2014: .303/.405/.360 – 30 BB/25 K – 0/3 SB – 175 AB) (2015: .269/.370/.366 – 27 BB/33 K – 6/7 SB – 189 AB)

Northern Kentucky JR C Logan Spurlin (2015): 6-4, 220 pounds (2014: .350/.416/.503 – 17 BB/39 K – 0/0 SB – 183 AB) (2015: .218/.351/.324 – 19 BB/31 K – 0/0 SB – 142 AB)

Pac-12 2015 MLB Draft All-Prospect Team – HITTERS

First Team

Washington JR C Austin Rei
Oregon JR 1B/OF Phillipe Craig-St. Louis
Arizona JR 2B Scott Kingery
Arizona JR SS Kevin Newman
Oregon JR 3B Mitchell Tolman
Oregon State JR OF Jeff Hendrix
UCLA JR OF Ty Moore
Washington JR OF Braden Bishop

Second Team

Arizona State JR C RJ Ybarra
Oregon State JR 1B Gabe Clark
UCLA rJR 2B Kevin Kramer
Stanford JR SS Drew Jackson
Arizona State JR 3B Dalton DiNatale
Oregon rJR OF Scott Heineman
USC JR OF Timmy Robinson
Arizona JR OF Justin Behnke

I’ve touched on both Washington JR C Austin Rei and Oregon SR C Shaun Chase recently, so I won’t go into great depth on either again. I was hoping to see one or both make a serious run for college ball’s top catching prospect in 2015, but a torn thumb ligament for Rei and the continued inability to make adjustments as a hitter for Chase have knocked both out of the running. That said, I still think Rei gets picked way higher than anybody thinks because he’s coming into pro ball at the perfect time with plus pitch framing skills that match what teams want to see most in catching prospects. I’m a really big fan of Rei and think he’s one of the draft’s “safest” prospects with both a high ceiling (above-average regular) and high floor (elite defensive backup). Barring additional injuries, I don’t see how he doesn’t have some sort of big league career.

Arizona State JR C RJ Ybarra has had the kind of year I was expecting to see out of Chase. It doesn’t hurt that their player profiles are so similar: big arms, big power, big bodies, and raw defenders. Ybarra’s better approach gives him the edge as a hitter and prospect for now. Long time readers of the site (all six of you) will remember I’ve long been on the Riley Moore bandwagon. No reason to hop off now that the Arizona senior catcher is having his best season at the plate. For teams looking for athleticism and leadership in their catching prospects, he’s a great fit. Relative to where he’ll likely be picked, I think he winds up being a pretty nifty player. His numbers this year very closely mimic what Stanford JR C Austin Barr has done as of this writing. Barr is another member of the Chase/Ybarra/Graham (see below) group of upside bats with TBD defensive possibilities.

Oregon JR C/RHP Josh Graham is one of the most intriguing two-way talents in the country. I have him listed with the catchers for now, but I’ve heard the split on his pro future is pretty much 50/50 for folks in the game. He’s been up to 96 off the mound in the past (haven’t heard any updates in 2015, but his numbers have been really good) while also showing above-average raw power at the plate. His rawness definitely shows up both as a hitter and in the field, but the upside is significant.

There really aren’t any words to accurately describe USC SR C Garrett Stubbs. He’s a player you really need to see play to understand. Catchers with plus athleticism, above-average speed, and the defensive talent to actually stick behind the plate over the long haul don’t come around every day. I’m not sure that his power spike so far this year is real (track record suggests it is just a typical senior year bump), but if a team buys in to him potentially having even average raw power then you’re talking about a unique skill set with legitimate big league value.

It comes down to a Civil War battle for which first base prospect will wind up the conference’s best bet to be drafted first in 2015. I go back and forth almost daily – don’t be jealous of the exciting life that I live – between Oregon JR 1B/OF Phillipe Craig-St. Louis and Oregon State JR 1B Gabe Clark. It’s slightly more complicated than this, but today it comes down to the hit tool of Craig-St.Louis winning out by a hair over the power upside of Clark. Tomorrow I might go with the power.

I swear I’ve written about Arizona JR 2B/OF Scott Kingery on the internet somewhere before this season, but I can’t find proof of it anywhere. No matter, as I’m happy to write about one of my favorite 2015 draft prospects all over again for the first time. Of course, you can’t really write about Kingery without also writing about his double-play partner JR SS/2B Kevin Newman. Both players have the chance for plus hit tools in the big leagues with enough pop (average for Kingery, a touch less than that for Newman) and speed (above-average to plus for Kingery, average to above-average for Newman) to be really valuable offensive players. Defensively, Newman’s instincts are so damn good that I think he’s a sure-fire shortstop for a long time even without the kind of physical tools some teams demand in the middle infield talent. I hesitate to add that last part because it sells Newman’s actual tools short. Though he’s not plus in any area (except arguably the hit tool), every other non-power tool is at least average and that’s before getting bumped up because of his preternatural feel for the game.

Somebody smart told me that Newman reminded him of Dansby Swanson “without the super-charged athleticism.” He meant it as a compliment for both guys: Swanson is both a talented ballplayer and a freak athlete worthy of top ten consideration while Newman, a back-end first round pick in his eyes, can do almost everything Swanson can do without being gifted freaky tools (i.e., Newman does more with less). The description I got on Kingery was equally impressive. I was told that “he plays second base like a center fielder.” Again, though I can see how this might be perceived as a slight, this was meant in a very good way. Kingery is such a good athlete that his range at second base, especially on balls into the air behind him, is second to none. I was actually on the fence about his glove being able to stick in the infield this year, but only because I thought he could be good at second and potentially great in center. Now I’m confident that he could be an excellent defender at either spot.

If the preceding paragraphs weren’t clear, I’m all-in on both Kingery and Newman as potential first round picks. Tools, athleticism, instincts, approach, track record…not sure what else you could ask for. If these guys were doing what they are doing while playing for a certain ACC school disproportionately, for reasons both fair (proximity) and not so fair (not so thinly veiled fandom) covered by a certain publication, then we’d be getting weekly updates on their progress and the only draft question left would how high they’d go in the first. I’m extremely tempted to put Kingery over Newman, but the magic of being able to play shortstop wins out for now. That may change between now and June.

There are more misses than hits on my 2011 HS second base rankings — boy, I liked Phillip Evans a lot — but USC SR 2B Dante Flores and UCLA rJR 2B/3B Kevin Kramer coming in at 6th and 8th respectively have held up all right. It took Flores three seasons to hit (he was actually really good as a freshman, but let me have my narrative) and it’s fair to wonder if something has really clicked or if it’s the senior season bounce I referenced above. I buy it as real, but take that for what it is since I’m the guy with “hasn’t turned into player many hoped, but still like him” in my notes from Flores after seeing him during last year’s disappointing junior season. Here are some of the old notes from four years ago on Flores…

Flores can definitely swing the bat, but his power upside is limited and he is an average at best runner. He’s a steady defender at second, capable of making plays on balls hit at or near him but lacking the athleticism and instincts to ever wow you at the spot. Prospects who lack positional safety nets — i.e. a spot on the diamond they can play if they can’t hack it at their original spot — make me really nervous. Flores is probably a second baseman or bust, so there is a lot riding on that hit tool.

Kramer’s return to health has gone even better than hoped in 2015. His bum shoulder that kept him out last season is but a distant memory now that he’s back swinging a hot bat. I haven’t heard how much arm strength he’s regained (it was average pre-injury), but if it’s enough for the left side then he’s a prime candidate for above-average big league utility infielder. That might be selling him short as he’s got the swing, hands, and feel to hit enough to play every day at second base at the next level. Here are Kramer’s HS notes from 2011…

Strength, both at the plate and jammed into his throwing arm, describes Kramer’s biggest current asset. I also like his bat a lot — feel like I’ve said that about a half dozen players already, but it’s true — and have a strong intuitive feel on him.

I still have Arizona State JR 2B/RHP Jordan Aboites listed as a primary infielder, but his pro future will likely come on the mound if it comes at all. If that’s the case, I can vouch for his showing up on a Fangraphs list before too long as one of Carson Cistulli’s favorite prospects. Relievers who stand 5-5, 150 pounds with ridiculous athleticism, solid velocity (88-92), and plus breaking balls tend to be fairly popular players. I mean, even I love the guy and I’m an old curmudgeonly jerk.

California SR 2B/3B Chris Paul is another Pac-12 middle infielder who took longer than expected to hit, but appears to have figured something out in 2015. Stanford JR SS/RHP Drew Jackson might be the guy we talk about in a similar vein next season. I’ve come full circle on him, originally thinking he was overhyped back when some mentioned him as a first round sleeper to now believing he’s being undervalued as a toolsy athlete with as yet untapped upside. He’s got the goods to stick at shortstop (his plus-plus arm being his best tool) with enough offensive talent (plus speed, average raw power) to intrigue. I think the combination of his preseason draft expectations and the lure of a Stanford diploma will make him a very tough sign this summer, but that’s just one outsider’s take.

Oregon JR 3B/1B Mitchell Tolman has been under the radar for too long. He’s a steady, versatile (can also play 2B) defender with average speed, ample arm strength, and a patient approach. This is a “in no way is this a comparison” comparison, but Tolman’s profile is a little bit like the college game’s version of Matt Carpenter. Arizona State JR 3B/OF Dalton DiNatale is another guy who can play multiple spots. He’s also got a solid approach and good size. Utah rSO 3B Dallas Carroll is a good athlete with, you guessed it, a good approach, but I mostly wanted to include him since I felt bad for stiffing the Utah offense otherwise. JR 2B Kody Davis and JR SS Cody Scaggari are nice players, too!

Oregon State JR OF Jeff Hendrix is a fine looking prospect who hasn’t gotten much (any?) national attention just yet. If you’re starting to pick up on a trend with the Pac-12 this year, then you’re smarter than you look. On paper, Hendrix sounds damn good: above-average to plus raw power, average to above-average speed, and great athleticism. He’s made steady improvements on the field with little sign of slowing down. It’s rare that an honest to goodness potential top five round gets overshadowed like this – perhaps it has something to do with being teammates with the extremely impressive freshman KJ Harrison – but he’ll get his due before too long.

UCLA JR OF/LHP Ty Moore is living proof that you can have average tools across the board so long as the best of said tools is the bat, whether it’s straight hit or power. Moore has as good a hit tool as you’ll find in this year’s class. The rest of his tools may be more or less average, but that hit tool will keep him getting paid for years to come. It’s a bit of a tricky profile in an outfield corner, but those with confidence in him as a hitter will give him a long look. I’m buying it.

Meanwhile, Washington JR OF/RHP Braden Bishop is the anti-Moore. His tools have always been loud (plus arm strength, plus to plus-plus speed, plus CF range), but his bat has long been a question. By all accounts he has turned a corner as a hitter so far this spring, which is both great to see from a personal perspective and because it adds yet another talented up-the-middle talent to this year’s draft class. USC JR OF Timmy Robinson isn’t quite the same athlete, but works as another potential anti-Moore (or, more aptly, Moore’s inverse prospect) with four average or better tools (all but the hit).

I was very excited to see Oregon rJR OF/3B Scott Heineman back and healthy after getting past a lost 2014 season. There have been signs of rust both at the plate and in the field, but no real drop in his impressive set of tools. I’m starting to think of him more as a potential super utility player (OF, 3B, 2B, maybe some C) at the highest level, though I admit that usage like that might not exactly be all that realistic an outcome knowing what we know about how most big league managers favor more defined roles. I’m also starting to get the feeling that Heineman could be one of those players who, for whatever reason, wind up as better pros than collegiate players.

The positive buzz on Arizona JR OF Justin Behnke coming into the season was unrelenting, so it’s good to see him delivering on his promise in his first year as a Wildcat. He’s an easy to appreciate prospect who wisely plays within himself and accentuates his strengths (speed, defense, plate discipline) with smarts and good baseball instincts. I’m a fan. Arizona State JR OF John Sewald is his brother from another mother at a rival school. Neither player ever gives off the future regular in the big leagues vibe, but both have clear, usable skill sets that help you envision a path to the highest level as a valuable role player.

Though he’s done next to nothing so far this year, Stanford JR OF Zach Hoffpauir remains one of the draft’s most intriguing wild cards. He’s incredibly raw and a little stiff in his baseball movements, but still flashes the athleticism, strength, and power that keep him on follow lists. I’ve cooled a bit on football to baseball conversions, especially those that have trained their bodies to play on the gridiron during their college years, after getting the chance to talk to some really smart people in the game on the subject (both old school types and younger front office members privy to some interesting proprietary research). Washington State rJR OF Ben Roberts never played football for the Cougars, but much of what was written above applies to him all the same: tools aplenty, but hasn’t done it on the field enough to warrant serious draft consideration in 2015. Speaking of tools…I don’t recall if I’ve shared this before and I’m too lazy to check, but seeing in my notes that USC rSR OF Omar Cotto Lozada was once described to me as “if Usain Bolt played baseball” always brightens my day. I’d drop a pick in round forty on the guy just to watch him run.

2015 MLB Draft Talent – Hitting

  1. Arizona JR SS/2B Kevin Newman
  2. Arizona JR 2B/OF Scott Kingery
  3. Washington JR C Austin Rei
  4. Oregon State JR OF Jeff Hendrix
  5. UCLA JR OF/LHP Ty Moore
  6. Washington JR OF/RHP Braden Bishop
  7. Oregon rJR OF/3B Scott Heineman
  8. UCLA rJR 2B/3B Kevin Kramer
  9. Oregon JR 3B/1B Mitchell Tolman
  10. Stanford JR SS/RHP Drew Jackson
  11. Arizona State JR C RJ Ybarra
  12. Oregon SR C Shaun Chase
  13. Arizona SR C Riley Moore
  14. USC SR 2B Dante Flores
  15. USC JR OF Timmy Robinson
  16. Arizona JR OF Justin Behnke
  17. Arizona State JR 3B/OF Dalton DiNatale
  18. Arizona State rSR OF Trever Allen
  19. Arizona JR OF Zach Gibbons
  20. Oregon JR C/RHP Josh Graham
  21. Stanford JR C Austin Barr
  22. USC SR C Garrett Stubbs
  23. California SR 2B/3B Chris Paul
  24. Arizona State JR OF John Sewald
  25. Oregon JR 1B/OF Phillipe Craig-St. Louis
  26. Stanford JR OF Zach Hoffpauir
  27. USC JR SS Blake Lacey
  28. Oregon State JR 1B Gabe Clark
  29. Washington State rJR OF Ben Roberts
  30. UCLA JR 2B Trent Chatterdon
  31. UCLA JR C Darrell Miller
  32. Arizona JR 2B/SS Jackson Willeford
  33. USC rSO SS Reggie Southall
  34. Oregon rSR OF Steven Packard
  35. USC rSR OF Omar Cotto Lozada
  36. Utah JR SS Cody Scaggari
  37. Utah rSO 3B Dallas Carroll
  38. UCLA rJR C Justin Hazard